After a weekend of vigorous and sometimes contentious debates over whether nonlawyers should be allowed to provide simple legal services, the American Bar Association’s House of Delegates on Monday voted to adopt a resolution that gives states a framework to consider the regulation of “nontraditional legal service providers.”

The resolution, dubbed Resolution 105, aims to address the justice gap by taking the modest step of acknowledging that some states may want to let nonlawyers provide legal services. Its advocates included former ABA president William Hubbard.

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