A lot of lawyers today find themselves in the unexpected position of trying to practice law in an area in which they have insufficient experience. Some of them are new lawyers who had hoped to get hired upon graduation and receive on-the-job training under the guidance of experienced lawyers. Some were downsized in the recession and, due to a slow market for their existing expertise, they find it necessary to develop a new area of practice. Other lawyers just want to make a change into a different type of practice.

This article sets out a number of ideas on how to garner needed experience when you don’t already have the support system to provide it. Since I’m a Texas lawyer, I cite examples of Texas programs, but other jurisdictions have similar options.

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