Lawyers for the investment services provider Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC on Monday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to keep in place a federal appeals court ruling that said the company could not be held liable in a private lawsuit for merely telling U.S. financial regulators about an allegedly suspicious stock transaction.

Fidelity, represented by the law firm Jones Day, is vying to leave undisturbed an April 2019 decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. A provision of the federal Bank Secrecy Act accords immunity to financial institutions that make voluntary and confidential disclosures called “suspicious activity reports.” These submissions, widely known by their acronym SARs, help federal authorities investigate potential financial misconduct.

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