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WHAT WE’RE WATCHING

 

REPORT RELEASE - U.S. Attorney General William Barr is expected today to release a redacted version of Robert Mueller’s nearly 400-page report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Barr, who has scheduled a 9:30 a.m. press conference with deputy AG Rod Rosenstein, has said he would redact certain elements from the report to protect, among other things, grand jury information. The DOJ says a limited number of members of Congress and their staff will have access to a copy of the report without certain redactions. Two lawsuits—one from BuzzFeed and another from the Electronic Privacy Information Center—could challenge the scope of any redactions.

PHONY BUSINESS - A 23-year-old Tennessee man who apparently cut and pasted lawyer profiles from Cravath’s website to create a fake one has been charged with impersonating an attorney, Jack Newsham reports. John Lambert, suspected of using the alias “Eric Pope,” was charged in Manhattan federal court with wire fraud and conspiracy for allegedly taking upward of $16,000 under false pretenses from consumers and businesses who found him online. Some of the fake biographies appearing on Lambert’s “law firm” website were lifted word for word from Cravath’s.

TECHIES - Demand for lawyers who know their way around blockchain and cryptocurrency is exceeding supply, MP McQueen reports. With the likes of JPMorgan Chase & Co. testing their own digital currency, lawyers who understand the promise and risks associated with the technologies are getting scooped up by firms with plans to snag business from the growing market.


EDITOR’S PICKS

 

What Do Women Want? Law Firms Are Clueless.

Longtime Dell Lawyer Becomes General Counsel of Ingredion

Quinn Emanuel’s Daniel Cunningham, Finance Pro Who Helped Take on Wall Street, Dies at 69

Boeing Hit With Lawsuit Over Crash of Ethiopian Airlines’ 737 Max 8

US Appeals Court Is Urged to Protect LGBT Employees Against Discrimination

Wilson Sonsini Sued by Ex-Clients Who Seek to Halt $480K Fees Arbitration


WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING

 

RUFFLED - Following the U.S. government’s announcement that American citizens will soon be allowed to bring lawsuits against U.S. and foreign companies using property confiscated by the Cuban government after the Cuban Revolution, the EU and Canada said they will use all available means to defend their interests in Cuba, including a possible challenge at the World Trade Organization. As Simon Taylor reports, the Trump administration on Tuesday announced it would end a policy that has prevented Americans from suing over property confiscated by the Cuban government after the 1959 Cuban Revolution.


WHAT YOU SAID

“I think we’re very well-equipped to handle it. But it’s obviously a docket that we didn’t necessarily expect when I came into this job, I guess is how I would put it.”

— JESSIE LIU, U.S. ATTORNEY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, ON AN INCREASE IN WORK IN HER OFFICE FROM MATTERS RELATED TO SPECIAL COUNSEL ROBERT MUELLER’S COMPLETED INVESTIGATION.


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