President Donald Trump and his supporters boasted Sunday of a “total and complete exoneration” by the special counsel investigating Russia’s ties to his 2016 presidential campaign, but that wasn’t entirely the case—at least when it comes to whether the president tried to obstruct the special counsel’s investigation.

U.S. Attorney General William Barr, consulting with Rod Rosenstein, his deputy, determined there was insufficient evidence to show the president obstructed justice during special counsel Robert Mueller’s 22-month-long probe. Mueller laid out the arguments for both sides—in a word, “punting,” as many commentators called it. Mueller did not find evidence supporting a conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russians to meddle in the election.

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