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A man holds a sign that reads in Spanish "They attack for oil" during a march of in support of the state-run oil company PDVSA, in Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. The government called for a mass rally to denounce U.S. sanctions against PDVSA that could starve Maduro's government of billions in export revenue but turnout was no more than a few hundred people. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos) A man holds a sign that reads in Spanish “They attack for oil” during a march of in support of the state-run oil company PDVSA, in Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. The government called for a mass rally to denounce U.S. sanctions against PDVSA that could starve Maduro’s government of billions in export revenue but turnout was no more than a few hundred people. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

As some U.S. companies anticipate a coup in Venezuela, which could open the door for new business opportunities, others are screening their transactions for potential sanctions-related risks, according to international trade lawyers.

Phillip Bantz

Phillip Bantz is a reporter for Corporate Counsel. Follow him on Twitter @PhillipBantz.

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