Deepfakes may not presently be a top cybersecurity concern for many lawyers. But as the believable fraudulent and doctored videos or audio are becoming more prevalent, they could cause perilous financial and reputation effects on clients.

Deepfakes use machine learning techniques, feeding a computer real data about images or audio, to create a believable video. In a widely publicized instance,  a video disseminated by the Trump administration of a journalist interacting with the president’s staff was found to be doctored intentionally, according to The Associated Press.

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