Managing cybersecurity risk has quickly become one of the biggest organizational concerns of the 21st century, especially when that risk is distributed across a number of employees, partners and third-party vendors. But in the new and steadily growing gig economy, that risk can be spread far and wide: across thousands, even hundreds of thousands, of contract workers.

Eversheds Sutherland partner and U.S. leader of the firm’s global cybersecurity and privacy practice Michael Bahar explained that for enterprising hackers looking for personal information, a gig economy company presents an enormous trove of valuable data. “Some of these companies, like the Ubers, they become the iconic ‘bank.’ People know that there’s a lot of personal information, both of the driver or the person moonlighting, as well as their customers,” he said.

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