Women Change Jobs Because They Want Better Pay, Not Work-Life Balance

Women Change Jobs Because They Want Better Pay, Not Work-Life Balance DragonImages / iStock

There’s a big misconception about why 30-something women change jobs, according to a recent Harvard Business Review article by Christie Hunter Arscott. Citing a survey by ICEDR, Hunter Arscott argues that the top reason women in their 30s make a career move is better pay, not better work-life balance, as many believe.

“According to women themselves (and in sharp contrast to the perceptions of their leaders), the primary factor influencing their decisions to leave their organizations is pay,” Hunter Arscott writes. She notes that four out of the top five reasons why women and men leave a company are the same.

With this research in mind, here’s what she suggests doing to mitigate talent loss:

Ask them: “To be successful, retention initiatives must be rooted in the needs and desires of the talent segments that they are designed to target,” advises Hunter Arscott. Call on the women in your company to help develop retention strategies.

Considering compensation: Work-life balance is important, but so is equitable compensation, writes Hunter Arscott. Strategies that neglect the latter are misguided.

Don’t focus on gender alone: “Gender appears to have little impact on an individual’s reasons for leaving an organization,” writes Hunter Arscott. As such, implement strategies and programs that attempt to retain all employees at an organization.

There’s a big misconception about why 30-something women change jobs, according to a recent Harvard Business Review article by Christie Hunter Arscott. Citing a survey by ICEDR, Hunter Arscott argues that the top reason women in their 30s make a career move is better pay, not better work-life balance, as many believe.

“According to women themselves (and in sharp contrast to the perceptions of their leaders), the primary factor influencing their decisions to leave their organizations is pay,” Hunter Arscott writes. She notes that four out of the top five reasons why women and men leave a company are the same.

With this research in mind, here’s what she suggests doing to mitigate talent loss:

Ask them: “To be successful, retention initiatives must be rooted in the needs and desires of the talent segments that they are designed to target,” advises Hunter Arscott. Call on the women in your company to help develop retention strategies.

Considering compensation: Work-life balance is important, but so is equitable compensation, writes Hunter Arscott. Strategies that neglect the latter are misguided.

Don’t focus on gender alone: “Gender appears to have little impact on an individual’s reasons for leaving an organization,” writes Hunter Arscott. As such, implement strategies and programs that attempt to retain all employees at an organization.

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