Summertime, and the Hiring Can Be Complicated

Summertime, and the Hiring Can Be Complicated

Summer is here and that means seasonal hires. As Brett Snider explains on FindLaw’s Free Enterprise, there are five “must-have” clauses that need to be included in seasonal employment contracts.

  • Length of Contract (Term of Employment): Snider says be as specific as possible when defining the duration of a summer employee’s contract so there is no confusion as to when the job is over. A termination clause can also be included specifying how the employer or intern can go about ending employment with or without notice.
  • Compensation: Be exact when describing the kind of compensation a summer hire will receive, he says, including whether it will be hourly, salaried or by the completed project, as well as detailing any possible benefits and your vacation policy.
  • Independent Contractor or Employee: Be careful which term is used to define the employee, Snider says. If the person is a contractor, make sure the contract states that fact, the scope of the work, who is responsible for payment, and that the worker will not receive employee benefits.
  • Nondisclosure Agreement: The summer hire may be exposed to sensitive information, so be sure to include a nondisclosure in each contract, advises Snider.
  • Arbitration/Mediation: Summer employment contracts should all have arbitration or mediation clauses that will force employees and contractors to go those routes should a legal issue arise. Snider says these clauses are almost always upheld by courts, even if they seem unfair to the employees.
LOAD MORE
Practice Area(s):
Industry: