Mazda Sued in Class Action Over Warranties

Mazda Sued in Class Action Over Warranties Photo: Neil de Carteret via Wikimedia Commons. Mazda RX-8.

Mazda Motor of America Inc. has been hit with a class action in a California federal district court by consumers accusing the company of failing to honor customer warranties by not repairing defects in Mazda RX8 engines that cause them to flood.

Plaintiff Christina Paschal filed the complaint on April 16 in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California on behalf of herself and others who purchased or leased a 2004-2008 Mazda RX8 vehicle manufactured, distributed, and sold by Mazda and its subsidiaries.

She alleges that at least 50,000 vehicles are a part of the class, and that Mazda has known about the defects since 2004, if not earlier. Read the complaint here.

Paschal claims that due to defects in the design, manufacture and assembly of the RX8 rotary engines they are susceptible to engine flooding and fuel flooded spark plugs. When the engine floods, the cars won’t start and costly repairs are needed.

Paschal also alleges that although Mazda issued a warranty extension to owners and lessees of the class vehicles in order to address complaints about the engine defect, Mazda has never come up with an adequate remedy to eliminate the defect. The company also failed to pay for all repairs needed during the warranty extension time period due to the engine defect, she said.

As a result of Mazda’s misconduct, Paschal and class members have been harmed by incurring out of pocket unreimbursed costs and by not receiving full benefits of Mazda’s extended engine core warranty including new spark plugs as part of the repair.

The suit cites various state law violations by Mazda including the California Secret Warranty Law because Mazda allegedly refused to disclose to customers an adjustment program relating to the engine defect. The law requires in part that automakers must notify consumers whenever they enact “any program or policy that expands or extends the consumer’s warranty beyond its stated limit.”

Laura Castro contributes to law.com.

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