(Jason Doiy)

A Cape May County jury has awarded a Pennsylvania woman $1.58 million as compensation for injuries she sustained when her bicycle was struck by a work vehicle owned by Sea Isle City and operated by an employee.

In Martin v. Sea Isle City, the jury awarded the funds to plaintiff Rhonda Martin, now 58, of North Wales, Pennsylvania, on Aug. 10, said Martin’s attorney, Kevin Parsons.

The jury awarded Martin $1.5 million for past and future pain and suffering, disability and loss of enjoyment; $60,000 for future medical expenses, and $20,813 for past medical expenses, said Parsons, of Gill & Chamas in Woodbridge.

Martin was injured on July 23, 2014. At the time, she was riding her bicycle south on Landis Avenue in Sea Isle City, and was planning on crossing the Townsends Inlet Bridge into Avalon, Parsons said. At the same time, Sea Isle City employee Jeffrey Jones also was driving his work vehicle south on Landis Avenue, Parsons said.

The suit claimed that, as they neared a three-point intersection with Landis, 93d Street and Roberts Avenue, Jones abruptly veered right and struck Martin’s bicycle, according to Parsons.

Martin sustained a broken left elbow, a tear to her left rotator cuff and tears to two ligaments in her left wrist, Parsons said. She underwent surgery to repair damage to her elbow and was in physical therapy for two years.

The case was unsuccessfully mediated before retired Superior Court Judge James Isman, who now runs his own mediation firm, Parsons said.

Sea Isle City and its carriers—the Atlantic County Municipal Insurance Fund and the Municipal Excess Liability Joint Insurance Fund—retained Thomas Smith, who heads a firm in Linwood. He did not return a call seeking comment.

Jury Awards $1.5M for Job Site Fall

Moreira v. JSM at Fairways:An Essex County jury awarded $1.5 million on Aug. 4 to an ironworker who was injured after falling 10 feet from a ladder and striking a concrete floor.

On December 1, 2012, Marco Moreira, then 38, of Newark, fell onto a concrete floor inside a mixed-use building that was open to the elements while working at a jobsite in Piscataway. He had surgery to repair his fractured left elbow, torn left rotator cuff, torn left triceps tendon, and ruptured left Achilles tendon. He was an employee of G&K Ironworks, which was a subcontractor to general contractor JSM at Fairways, according to the suit.

Moreira filed a suit against JSM, claiming it failed to comply with OSHA regulations requiring floors to be kept clear of snow and ice. The defense disputed the presence of ice, presenting expert testimony from a meteorologist and maintaining the weather was too warm and too dry to permit ice to form on the concrete floor. The plaintiff’s lawyer, Robert Baumgarten of Ginarte, Gallardo, Gonzalez & Winograd in Newark, countered that claim with testimony from four witnesses, he said.

Moreira has returned to his construction job but is in constant pain, according to Baumgarten.

The jury issued its verdict after five days of trial before Judge Deborah Gross-Quatrone, ordering JSM at Fairways to pay $1.5 million.

The lawyer for JSM, Daniel Jahnsen Sr. of Bolan Jahnsen Dacey in Red Bank, confirmed the verdict. He said he will file a motion for a new trial, based on his argument that weather conditions would not permit ice to form on the building’s floor.

A Cape May County jury has awarded a Pennsylvania woman $1.58 million as compensation for injuries she sustained when her bicycle was struck by a work vehicle owned by Sea Isle City and operated by an employee.

In Martin v. Sea Isle City, the jury awarded the funds to plaintiff Rhonda Martin, now 58, of North Wales, Pennsylvania, on Aug. 10, said Martin’s attorney, Kevin Parsons.

The jury awarded Martin $1.5 million for past and future pain and suffering, disability and loss of enjoyment; $60,000 for future medical expenses, and $20,813 for past medical expenses, said Parsons, of Gill & Chamas in Woodbridge.

Martin was injured on July 23, 2014. At the time, she was riding her bicycle south on Landis Avenue in Sea Isle City, and was planning on crossing the Townsends Inlet Bridge into Avalon, Parsons said. At the same time, Sea Isle City employee Jeffrey Jones also was driving his work vehicle south on Landis Avenue, Parsons said.

The suit claimed that, as they neared a three-point intersection with Landis, 93d Street and Roberts Avenue, Jones abruptly veered right and struck Martin’s bicycle, according to Parsons.

Martin sustained a broken left elbow, a tear to her left rotator cuff and tears to two ligaments in her left wrist, Parsons said. She underwent surgery to repair damage to her elbow and was in physical therapy for two years.

The case was unsuccessfully mediated before retired Superior Court Judge James Isman, who now runs his own mediation firm, Parsons said.

Sea Isle City and its carriers—the Atlantic County Municipal Insurance Fund and the Municipal Excess Liability Joint Insurance Fund—retained Thomas Smith , who heads a firm in Linwood. He did not return a call seeking comment.

Jury Awards $1.5M for Job Site Fall

Moreira v. JSM at Fairways:An Essex County jury awarded $1.5 million on Aug. 4 to an ironworker who was injured after falling 10 feet from a ladder and striking a concrete floor.

On December 1, 2012, Marco Moreira, then 38, of Newark, fell onto a concrete floor inside a mixed-use building that was open to the elements while working at a jobsite in Piscataway. He had surgery to repair his fractured left elbow, torn left rotator cuff, torn left triceps tendon, and ruptured left Achilles tendon. He was an employee of G&K Ironworks, which was a subcontractor to general contractor JSM at Fairways, according to the suit.

Moreira filed a suit against JSM, claiming it failed to comply with OSHA regulations requiring floors to be kept clear of snow and ice. The defense disputed the presence of ice, presenting expert testimony from a meteorologist and maintaining the weather was too warm and too dry to permit ice to form on the concrete floor. The plaintiff’s lawyer, Robert Baumgarten of Ginarte, Gallardo, Gonzalez & Winograd in Newark, countered that claim with testimony from four witnesses, he said.

Moreira has returned to his construction job but is in constant pain, according to Baumgarten.

The jury issued its verdict after five days of trial before Judge Deborah Gross-Quatrone, ordering JSM at Fairways to pay $1.5 million.

The lawyer for JSM, Daniel Jahnsen Sr. of Bolan Jahnsen Dacey in Red Bank, confirmed the verdict. He said he will file a motion for a new trial, based on his argument that weather conditions would not permit ice to form on the building’s floor.