2016 N.J. State of the State Address by Gov. Chris Christie.
2016 N.J. State of the State Address by Gov. Chris Christie. (Carmen Natale)

Gov. Chris Christie signed a bill Monday restricting firearms possession for those charged with committing acts of domestic violence, as well as several other bills regulating electronic waste and other toxic waste. He also signed a bill requiring quality-control regulations for bioanalytical laboratories.

Christie signed the bills into law largely without comment.

The first bill, S2483, would enhance restrictions on firearms possession by those convicted of committing acts of domestic violence. Offenders would be required, immediately on sentencing, to surrender all firearms, firearms purchase permits and firearms possession licenses.

The bill, sponsored by Sen. Jennifer Beck, R-Monmouth, and Sen. Loretta Weinberg, D-Bergen, passed with only minor opposition.

“Survivors of domestic violence will be safer than ever before,” Christie said in a brief statement.

“The enactment of this landmark legislation will prevent domestic abusers from committing acts of gun violence,” added Beck in a separate statement.

Christie’s position on gun regulation in the state has shifted more than once during his two terms in office. Last year, while still campaigning for a White House role, he vetoed a couple of gun control measures and asked the Democratic-controlled legislature to make it easier to carry concealed weapons.

A second bill, S981, requires any manufacturer of electronic devices, which includes such items as television sets and computers, to establish a system for recycling of used electronic devices based on each manufacturer’s market share. Current state law prohibits the disposal of used electronic devices through curbside trash pick-up. The bill imposes a 50-cent per pound charge on recycled electronics, to be paid by the manufacturers, in order to pay for the administration and enforcement of the recycling programs.

Jeffrey Tittel, the director of the New Jersey Sierra Club, said the legislation is needed since used electronics contain toxic materials that should not be allowed to collect at recycling centers and landfills.

Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia have passed legislation requiring some type of electronic waste recycling. The federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act mandates only that cathode-ray tubes be recycled, according to the Electronic Recycling Coordination Clearinghouse, a lobbying group.

The bill, which passed with only minor opposition, was sponsored by Sens. Robert Smith, D-Middlesex, and Christopher Bateman, R-Somerset.

Another bill, S909, says that the owner of any property that includes a toxic waste site will not have to establish a remediation funding source if the owner conducts an independent cleanup operation.

The bill, sponsored by Sen. Ronald Rice, D-Essex, passed the legislature without opposition.

Senate bill S976 requires the state Public Health Council to develop quality control regulations for bioanalytical and clinical laboratories. A bioanalytical lab is a laboratory that conducts chemical, blood, microscopic, bacteriologic or other tests to learn about an individual’s health. The council currently is required to only issue sanitary regulations.

The new law exempts laboratories that already have licenses from the federal Food and Drug Administration, and bars the council from imposing regulations that exceed federal regulations.

According to the state Department of Health, 15 other states and the District of Columbia have adopted regulations for bioanalytical laboratories, while 22 others require laboratories to follow federal regulations.

The legislation, which passed without opposition, was sponsored by Beck and Sen. Robert Gordon, D-Bergen.

Gov. Chris Christie signed a bill Monday restricting firearms possession for those charged with committing acts of domestic violence, as well as several other bills regulating electronic waste and other toxic waste. He also signed a bill requiring quality-control regulations for bioanalytical laboratories.

Christie signed the bills into law largely without comment.

The first bill, S2483, would enhance restrictions on firearms possession by those convicted of committing acts of domestic violence. Offenders would be required, immediately on sentencing, to surrender all firearms, firearms purchase permits and firearms possession licenses.

The bill, sponsored by Sen. Jennifer Beck, R-Monmouth, and Sen. Loretta Weinberg, D-Bergen, passed with only minor opposition.

“Survivors of domestic violence will be safer than ever before,” Christie said in a brief statement.

“The enactment of this landmark legislation will prevent domestic abusers from committing acts of gun violence,” added Beck in a separate statement.

Christie’s position on gun regulation in the state has shifted more than once during his two terms in office. Last year, while still campaigning for a White House role, he vetoed a couple of gun control measures and asked the Democratic-controlled legislature to make it easier to carry concealed weapons.

A second bill, S981, requires any manufacturer of electronic devices, which includes such items as television sets and computers, to establish a system for recycling of used electronic devices based on each manufacturer’s market share. Current state law prohibits the disposal of used electronic devices through curbside trash pick-up. The bill imposes a 50-cent per pound charge on recycled electronics, to be paid by the manufacturers, in order to pay for the administration and enforcement of the recycling programs.

Jeffrey Tittel, the director of the New Jersey Sierra Club, said the legislation is needed since used electronics contain toxic materials that should not be allowed to collect at recycling centers and landfills.

Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia have passed legislation requiring some type of electronic waste recycling. The federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act mandates only that cathode-ray tubes be recycled, according to the Electronic Recycling Coordination Clearinghouse, a lobbying group.

The bill, which passed with only minor opposition, was sponsored by Sens. Robert Smith, D-Middlesex, and Christopher Bateman, R-Somerset.

Another bill, S909, says that the owner of any property that includes a toxic waste site will not have to establish a remediation funding source if the owner conducts an independent cleanup operation.

The bill, sponsored by Sen. Ronald Rice, D-Essex, passed the legislature without opposition.

Senate bill S976 requires the state Public Health Council to develop quality control regulations for bioanalytical and clinical laboratories. A bioanalytical lab is a laboratory that conducts chemical, blood, microscopic, bacteriologic or other tests to learn about an individual’s health. The council currently is required to only issue sanitary regulations.

The new law exempts laboratories that already have licenses from the federal Food and Drug Administration, and bars the council from imposing regulations that exceed federal regulations.

According to the state Department of Health, 15 other states and the District of Columbia have adopted regulations for bioanalytical laboratories, while 22 others require laboratories to follow federal regulations.

The legislation, which passed without opposition, was sponsored by Beck and Sen. Robert Gordon, D-Bergen.