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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on Monday signed legislation that creates 20 new Superior Court judgeships, bringing the total number of authorized positions up to 463 from the present 443.

On the same day, the state Senate Judiciary Committee approved the nominations of 12 new Superior Court judges. If the nominees are confirmed by the full Senate tomorrow, which is expected, there will be a total of 429 sitting judges, which Christie said is the highest level in more than a decade. He will have to make nominations for the 20 slots created by the new law.

The nominees approved by the Judiciary Committee are Thomas Booth Jr. of Voorhees, Judith Charny of Cherry Hill; Linda Eynon of Cherry Hill; Christine Orlando of Haddon Heights; Darren DiBiasi of Glen Rock; Joseph Monaghan of Harrington Park; John O’Dwyer of Waldwick; Vincent Militello of Bayonne; Tara Rich of Secaucus; Frank DeAngelis of Towaco; Noah Franzblau of Mountain Lakes and Yolanda Rodriguez of Mount Laurel.

The creation of the 20 new judgeships is designed to help the judiciary implement its new bail reform system, which went into effect at the beginning of the year. Under the new system, criminal defendants will be subject to evaluation by judges to determine whether they should be released without bail pending trial, or held in pre-trial detention until they are tried. Those assessments must be made within 48 hours of arrest.

The state’s voters approved a change in the state constitution in 2014 that, for the first time, allows defendants charged with violent crimes, or who have a history of committing violent crimes, to be held in pre-trial detention until their trials. Under the new system, speedy trial guidelines require that defendants who are not eligible for release must be tried within 180 days after their indictment.

“This will be the largest number of sitting Superior Court judges at any one time,” Christie told reporters.

The legislation creating the new openings, S2850, passed both houses of the Legislature in December with only minor opposition. The legislation was sponsored by Senate president Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester; Sen. Christopher Bateman, R-Somerset; Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto, D-Hudson and Assembly Judiciary Committee chairman John McKeon, D-Essex.

Christie said he and legislators purposefully decided to not include language that would mandate where the new judges would be assigned.

“We wanted the chief justice to decide where they should go,” he said.

Chief Justice Stuart Rabner will assign the judges to vicinages depending on the number of pending cases.

Of the nominees approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday, Booth, Charny, Eynon and Orlando will be assigned to the Camden County Vicinage.

Booth has been with his own firm since 2002, and focuses on commercial litigation and property litigation. He is a graduate of Rutgers Law School-Camden and La Salle University.

Charny, since 1999, has been with what is now Charny, Charny & Karpousis in Cherry Hill, where she focuses her practice on matrimonial law. She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.

Eynon, since 2002, has been with Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey, most recently serving as the company’s Medicaid compliance officer. Before that she was the company’s legal counsel. She is a graduate of the University of Delaware and Rutgers Law School-Camden.

Orlando, since 2012, has been with the Cherry Hill office of Connell Foley, where she focuses her practice on insurance law, health care law, class action defense and commercial litigation. Orlando is a graduate of Saint Joseph’s University and Rutgers Law-Camden.

DiBiasi, Monaghan and O’Dwyer will be assigned to the Bergen County Vicinage.

DiBiasi, since 2006, has been with DiBiasi & Rinaldi in Nutley, where he focuses on land use law. He also is a judge for the Central Judicial Processing Court of Bergen County and for the municipal courts of Saddle River and West Caldwell. He is a graduate of the Georgetown University Law Center and James Madison University.

Monaghan has been, at various times since 1986 and at present, a solo in Hackensack, where he is a general practitioner. He is a graduate of Seton Hall University School of Law and Montclair State University.

O’Dwyer, since 1987, has been with Newark’s Ginarte O’Dwyer Gonzalez Gallardo & Winograd, where he focuses on civil litigation. He is a graduate of Boston University School of Law and Allegheny College.

Militello and Rich will be assigned to the Hudson County Vicinage.

Militello has been a deputy attorney general in the Division of Criminal Justice since 2006. He is a graduate of Seton Hall’s law school and Providence College.

Rich is with Hackensack’s Shapiro, Croland, Reiser, Apfel & Di Iorio, where she focuses her practice on matrimonial law. She is a graduate of Seton Hall’s law school and the Catholic University of America.

DeAngelis and Franzblau will be assigned to the Morris/Sussex County Vicinage.

DeAngelis is with Mound Cotton Wollan & Greengrass in Florham Park, where he focuses on domestic and international insurance defense litigation. He is a graduate of Seton Hall’s law school and Elizabethtown College.

Franzblau is with Franzblau Dratch in Livingston, where he focuses on tax law, intellectual property law, employment law and corporate law. He is a graduate of the University of Denver Law School and Tufts University.

Rodriguez, who will be assigned to the Burlington County Vicinage, is Christie’s appointments counsel and is responsible for gubernatorial nominations and appointments. She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School and Swarthmore College.

Contact the reporter at mbooth@alm.com.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on Monday signed legislation that creates 20 new Superior Court judgeships, bringing the total number of authorized positions up to 463 from the present 443.

On the same day, the state Senate Judiciary Committee approved the nominations of 12 new Superior Court judges. If the nominees are confirmed by the full Senate tomorrow, which is expected, there will be a total of 429 sitting judges, which Christie said is the highest level in more than a decade. He will have to make nominations for the 20 slots created by the new law.

The nominees approved by the Judiciary Committee are Thomas Booth Jr. of Voorhees, Judith Charny of Cherry Hill; Linda Eynon of Cherry Hill; Christine Orlando of Haddon Heights; Darren DiBiasi of Glen Rock; Joseph Monaghan of Harrington Park; John O’Dwyer of Waldwick; Vincent Militello of Bayonne; Tara Rich of Secaucus; Frank DeAngelis of Towaco; Noah Franzblau of Mountain Lakes and Yolanda Rodriguez of Mount Laurel.

The creation of the 20 new judgeships is designed to help the judiciary implement its new bail reform system, which went into effect at the beginning of the year. Under the new system, criminal defendants will be subject to evaluation by judges to determine whether they should be released without bail pending trial, or held in pre-trial detention until they are tried. Those assessments must be made within 48 hours of arrest.

The state’s voters approved a change in the state constitution in 2014 that, for the first time, allows defendants charged with violent crimes, or who have a history of committing violent crimes, to be held in pre-trial detention until their trials. Under the new system, speedy trial guidelines require that defendants who are not eligible for release must be tried within 180 days after their indictment.

“This will be the largest number of sitting Superior Court judges at any one time,” Christie told reporters.

The legislation creating the new openings, S2850, passed both houses of the Legislature in December with only minor opposition. The legislation was sponsored by Senate president Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester; Sen. Christopher Bateman, R-Somerset; Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto, D-Hudson and Assembly Judiciary Committee chairman John McKeon , D-Essex.

Christie said he and legislators purposefully decided to not include language that would mandate where the new judges would be assigned.

“We wanted the chief justice to decide where they should go,” he said.

Chief Justice Stuart Rabner will assign the judges to vicinages depending on the number of pending cases.

Of the nominees approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday, Booth, Charny, Eynon and Orlando will be assigned to the Camden County Vicinage.

Booth has been with his own firm since 2002, and focuses on commercial litigation and property litigation. He is a graduate of Rutgers Law School-Camden and La Salle University.

Charny, since 1999, has been with what is now Charny, Charny & Karpousis in Cherry Hill, where she focuses her practice on matrimonial law. She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.

Eynon, since 2002, has been with Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey, most recently serving as the company’s Medicaid compliance officer. Before that she was the company’s legal counsel. She is a graduate of the University of Delaware and Rutgers Law School-Camden.

Orlando, since 2012, has been with the Cherry Hill office of Connell Foley , where she focuses her practice on insurance law, health care law, class action defense and commercial litigation. Orlando is a graduate of Saint Joseph’s University and Rutgers Law-Camden.

DiBiasi, Monaghan and O’Dwyer will be assigned to the Bergen County Vicinage.

DiBiasi, since 2006, has been with DiBiasi & Rinaldi in Nutley, where he focuses on land use law. He also is a judge for the Central Judicial Processing Court of Bergen County and for the municipal courts of Saddle River and West Caldwell. He is a graduate of the Georgetown University Law Center and James Madison University.

Monaghan has been, at various times since 1986 and at present, a solo in Hackensack, where he is a general practitioner. He is a graduate of Seton Hall University School of Law and Montclair State University.

O’Dwyer, since 1987, has been with Newark’s Ginarte O’Dwyer Gonzalez Gallardo & Winograd, where he focuses on civil litigation. He is a graduate of Boston University School of Law and Allegheny College.

Militello and Rich will be assigned to the Hudson County Vicinage.

Militello has been a deputy attorney general in the Division of Criminal Justice since 2006. He is a graduate of Seton Hall’s law school and Providence College.

Rich is with Hackensack’s Shapiro, Croland, Reiser, Apfel & Di Iorio, where she focuses her practice on matrimonial law. She is a graduate of Seton Hall’s law school and the Catholic University of America.

DeAngelis and Franzblau will be assigned to the Morris/Sussex County Vicinage.

DeAngelis is with Mound Cotton Wollan & Greengrass in Florham Park, where he focuses on domestic and international insurance defense litigation. He is a graduate of Seton Hall’s law school and Elizabethtown College.

Franzblau is with Franzblau Dratch in Livingston, where he focuses on tax law, intellectual property law, employment law and corporate law. He is a graduate of the University of Denver Law School and Tufts University.

Rodriguez, who will be assigned to the Burlington County Vicinage, is Christie’s appointments counsel and is responsible for gubernatorial nominations and appointments. She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School and Swarthmore College.

Contact the reporter at mbooth@alm.com.