Stanley Mailman
Stanley Mailman (Courtesy photo)

Stanley Mailman, a prominent immigration lawyer who wrote columns on immigration law for the Law Journal for 30 years, died Saturday. He was 86.

“He was short in stature and a giant in immigration law,” said Stephen Yale-Loehr, who is of counsel at Miller Mayer in Ithaca and co-authored the immigration law column with Mailman for 10 years. “He was very kind-hearted. He was a mentor to me and a lot of people in immigration law.”

Mailman was born in 1930 in New York City to two Russian immigrants. He completed his undergraduate work at Cornell University, obtained his J.D. from Cornell Law School and received an LL.M. in international law from the New York University School of Law. He was admitted to practice in 1953.

While Mailman mainly practiced business immigration law, he also took up civil rights cases on behalf of immigrants.

He filed an amicus brief in Stokes v. INS, 393 F. Supp. 24 (SDNY 1975), which successfully challenged the constitutionality of some of the New York City immigration office’s procedures regarding marriage-related green cards.

In 1980, during the Haitian refugee crisis, he and other attorneys advocated for imprisoned refugees and, in Bertrand v. Sava, 684 F.2d 204 (2d Cir. 1981), the attorneys successfully argued that he and others successfully argued that federal courts could hear habeas corpus claims to review allegations that immigration officials abused their discretion in denying parole to detained Haitians.

Mailman most recently worked as of counsel to Satterlee Stephens Burke & Burke.

He began writing the immigration law column for the Law Journal in the mid-1970s. For about 25 years, until 2011, Mailman also coauthored Immigration Law and Procedure, a 21-volume treatise on the practice area. He has been retired ever since.

He is survived by his wife, Mary Ann; sons Joshua and Alex; and brother Philip.

Services are scheduled for 11 a.m. Tuesday at Plaza Jewish Community Chapel in Manhattan. The family requests donations be made to the immigration section of Sanctuary for Families or to Cornell University Law School for its immigration and asylum programs.

Stanley Mailman, a prominent immigration lawyer who wrote columns on immigration law for the Law Journal for 30 years, died Saturday. He was 86.

“He was short in stature and a giant in immigration law,” said Stephen Yale-Loehr, who is of counsel at Miller Mayer in Ithaca and co-authored the immigration law column with Mailman for 10 years. “He was very kind-hearted. He was a mentor to me and a lot of people in immigration law.”

Mailman was born in 1930 in New York City to two Russian immigrants. He completed his undergraduate work at Cornell University, obtained his J.D. from Cornell Law School and received an LL.M. in international law from the New York University School of Law . He was admitted to practice in 1953.

While Mailman mainly practiced business immigration law, he also took up civil rights cases on behalf of immigrants.

He filed an amicus brief in Stokes v. INS , 393 F. Supp. 24 ( SDNY 1975 ) , which successfully challenged the constitutionality of some of the New York City immigration office’s procedures regarding marriage-related green cards.

In 1980, during the Haitian refugee crisis, he and other attorneys advocated for imprisoned refugees and, in Bertrand v. Sava , 684 F.2d 204 ( 2d Cir. 1981 ) , the attorneys successfully argued that he and others successfully argued that federal courts could hear habeas corpus claims to review allegations that immigration officials abused their discretion in denying parole to detained Haitians.

Mailman most recently worked as of counsel to Satterlee Stephens Burke & Burke .

He began writing the immigration law column for the Law Journal in the mid-1970s. For about 25 years, until 2011, Mailman also coauthored Immigration Law and Procedure, a 21-volume treatise on the practice area. He has been retired ever since.

He is survived by his wife, Mary Ann ; sons Joshua and Alex; and brother Philip.

Services are scheduled for 11 a.m. Tuesday at Plaza Jewish Community Chapel in Manhattan. The family requests donations be made to the immigration section of Sanctuary for Families or to Cornell University Law School for its immigration and asylum programs.