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In May 2018, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), will be in place, meaning virtually any organization with data in or passing through the EU will have a host of new compliance requirements. And though warnings and reminders continue to surface, there remains concern that organizations haven’t started the road toward compliance.

Of course, among those advocates are major law firms that cater to the Fortune 500 crowd, and one of the ways they’re approaching compliance is through technology. On May 25, a date chosen to line up exactly a year before GDPR goes into effect, Hogan Lovells released its GDPRnow app. Available for download at the iTunes store, the app is meant to be a quick guide to aid organizations in prepping for GDPR compliance.

Here’s a look at the app and how it may help address compliance.

How it works: The app provides users with seven questions, and based off the answers, it generates an action plan for an organization to begin compliance efforts. The questions asked deal with issues like how data is stored and what sort of data is collected, while the actions generated by responses are organized by priority.

Who it serves: The GDPR itself will impact virtually anyone with data in the EU, regardless of organization type and size. Hogan Lovells global privacy and cybersecurity partner Eduardo Ustaran told LTN that the app “is suitable for both large multinational organizations and very small players,” but that the intended audience in each group is different. In the case or a larger company, the user would likely be privacy counsel, a privacy compliance officer, or a chief privacy or data protection officer, while a smaller company user would likely be the general counsel.

Why an app? While compliance may not be the first task that comes to mind when using your iPhone, Ustaran said Hogan Lovells thought the app was “a simple but effective way” to provide users with the questionnaire needed to generate the action report.

“We wanted to emphasize that despite the huge complexity of the whole European data framework and complexities of the GDPR, it’s not impossible to come up with a list of actions to do,” said Ustaran, who came up with the idea for the app.

What time should people start to use the app? Ustaran said that the firm chose May 25 to emphasize that “compliance is going to take time, but with a year to go it’s the right time to start getting on with it.” And while he said that all organizations are different, generally speaking, a year should be enough time to come up with a plan of action, identify priorities, and then address them on a quarterly basis.

What’s in it for Hogan Lovells? Rather than a perk for clients, the app is free for download and available to the general public. Further, usage of the app doesn’t require any direct consultation with Hogan Lovells attorneys. However, while the app can generate a generic action plan for an organization to begin working on compliance, actually undertaking a plan requires quite a bit more effort, and whether an organization can do that on their own depends on what resources they have in house. In the event that an organization needs to craft a contract or enact a policy, they could then call Hogan Lovells or any law firm of their choosing.

Law firm slash tech company? Not quite. While the Ustaran and Hogan Lovells are behind the idea of the app, it was developed by a partner company that the firm has worked with on past apps and its own website.

As of late, a spate of law firms have released apps to address compliance concerns for various regulations. Similar to other technology, some have questioned what sort of impact these apps could have on a lawyer’s role. Ustaran noted that though many may see device-delivery apps as a threat, he finds the viewpoint “very short-sighted.”

“Technology can be used to help you demonstrate your expertise,” he said. “The app is there to demonstrate our expertise, not just in the law but in how to take a complex problem and then provide a simple solution. … It’s always a way of testing the means at your disposal, the same way one lawyer one day to use a fax instead of a letter.”

Copyright Legaltech News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

In May 2018, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), will be in place, meaning virtually any organization with data in or passing through the EU will have a host of new compliance requirements. And though warnings and reminders continue to surface, there remains concern that organizations haven’t started the road toward compliance.

Of course, among those advocates are major law firms that cater to the Fortune 500 crowd, and one of the ways they’re approaching compliance is through technology. On May 25, a date chosen to line up exactly a year before GDPR goes into effect, Hogan Lovells released its GDPRnow app. Available for download at the iTunes store, the app is meant to be a quick guide to aid organizations in prepping for GDPR compliance.

Here’s a look at the app and how it may help address compliance.

How it works: The app provides users with seven questions, and based off the answers, it generates an action plan for an organization to begin compliance efforts. The questions asked deal with issues like how data is stored and what sort of data is collected, while the actions generated by responses are organized by priority.

Who it serves: The GDPR itself will impact virtually anyone with data in the EU, regardless of organization type and size. Hogan Lovells global privacy and cybersecurity partner Eduardo Ustaran told LTN that the app “is suitable for both large multinational organizations and very small players,” but that the intended audience in each group is different. In the case or a larger company, the user would likely be privacy counsel, a privacy compliance officer, or a chief privacy or data protection officer, while a smaller company user would likely be the general counsel.

Why an app? While compliance may not be the first task that comes to mind when using your iPhone, Ustaran said Hogan Lovells thought the app was “a simple but effective way” to provide users with the questionnaire needed to generate the action report.

“We wanted to emphasize that despite the huge complexity of the whole European data framework and complexities of the GDPR, it’s not impossible to come up with a list of actions to do,” said Ustaran, who came up with the idea for the app.

What time should people start to use the app? Ustaran said that the firm chose May 25 to emphasize that “compliance is going to take time, but with a year to go it’s the right time to start getting on with it.” And while he said that all organizations are different, generally speaking, a year should be enough time to come up with a plan of action, identify priorities, and then address them on a quarterly basis.

What’s in it for Hogan Lovells ? Rather than a perk for clients, the app is free for download and available to the general public. Further, usage of the app doesn’t require any direct consultation with Hogan Lovells attorneys. However, while the app can generate a generic action plan for an organization to begin working on compliance, actually undertaking a plan requires quite a bit more effort, and whether an organization can do that on their own depends on what resources they have in house. In the event that an organization needs to craft a contract or enact a policy, they could then call Hogan Lovells or any law firm of their choosing.

Law firm slash tech company? Not quite. While the Ustaran and Hogan Lovells are behind the idea of the app, it was developed by a partner company that the firm has worked with on past apps and its own website.

As of late, a spate of law firms have released apps to address compliance concerns for various regulations. Similar to other technology, some have questioned what sort of impact these apps could have on a lawyer’s role. Ustaran noted that though many may see device-delivery apps as a threat, he finds the viewpoint “very short-sighted.”

“Technology can be used to help you demonstrate your expertise,” he said. “The app is there to demonstrate our expertise, not just in the law but in how to take a complex problem and then provide a simple solution. … It’s always a way of testing the means at your disposal, the same way one lawyer one day to use a fax instead of a letter.”

Copyright Legaltech News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.