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A group backed by employees of TransPerfect Global Inc. is pressing the Delaware Court of Chancery to release details of how the custodian overseeing the company’s court-ordered sale has spent more than $18 million in fees and expenses.

The group, Citizens for a Pro-Business Delaware Inc., announced Tuesday that it had filed a motion asking the court to unseal documents relating to at least 32 confidential transactions undertaken by Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom partner Robert B. Pincus since he was appointed custodian in March 2015.

Responding to a notice filed by The Associated Press in March, Pincus disclosed a monthly accounting of more than $3.5 million in charges “reflecting services provided by the custodian, attorneys from the custodian’s law firm and counsel representing the custodian” in a separate lawsuit. However, the filing did not include fees or expenses paid to other counsel and advisers, and it did not detail how the money was spent.

Now, Citizens, which is not a party to the TransPerfect lawsuit, is seeking to expand the record.

“We are simply asking for Mr. Pincus to share where over $18 million of TransPerfect’s funds have been spent in the last 15 months,” Chris Coffey, the group’s campaign manager said in a statement. “Employees who are already fearful of losing their jobs are now spending more on benefits, while the custodian and his hidden consultants are raking in millions.”

Citizens has been particularly critical of $1,400 per hour rates Pincus has reported charging TransPerfect—an amount Citizens says is more than three times the average rate for similar services in Delaware.

In a brief dated May 12, Citizens asked to intervene in the case to enforce public access to Pincus’ submissions to the court, which the group argued were subject to approval by the court.

“Even if the court is not required to approve such fees and expenses, it necessarily remains that basic information concerning who the court-appointed custodian has hired and how much they have generated in fees and expenses are contained in judicial documents that must be disclosed,” Citizens attorney Evan O. Williford of the Williford Firm said in the filing.

“The custodian advisers’ fees and expenses are relevant to the performance of the judicial function and useful in the judicial process.”

Pincus’ attorney Jennifer C. Voss, also a partner with Skadden, declined to comment on the motion, and Pincus did not return a call seeking comment for this story.

The dustup over records is just the latest scrap in a three-year legal saga that continues to unfold in Delaware’s courts and beyond. In 2015, Chancellor Andre G. Bouchard ordered the forced sale of the profitable translation-services company after personal animosity between Philip R. Shawe and Elizabeth Elting, the firm’s co-founders and chief executives, plunged its corporate governance structure into a hopeless state of gridlock. That decision has since been upheld by the Delaware Supreme Court.

However, Shawe and his mother, Shirley Shawe, have launched a federal lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the sale, and Shirley has asked Bouchard to compel a stockholder’s meeting to adopt a plan that she argues could avert the need for a forced sale. Elting, who rejected the proposal out of court, has moved for sanctions against Shirley for pursuing her motion.

Meanwhile, Citizens has been engaged in an intense lobbying campaign in Dover, as it pushes legislation that could be used in ongoing efforts to overturn Bouchard’s controversial decision.

The bill would require a three-year “cooling-off” period before a judge could order the sale of a solvent private company, and it would require the court to first pursue other avenues to resolve corporate conflict. The Delaware State Bar Association declined to include the measure in its annual package of proposed amendments to the Delaware General Corporation Law, but a group of seven sponsors have introduced the legislation in the General Assembly.

Earlier this month, The New Journal reported that Citizens faced blowback from lawmakers over ads set to air in Delaware, Nevada and Rhode Island, which they said cast the First State in a bad light. The group has since pulled the ads outside of Delaware, and Coffey wrote in an op-ed that he still expected lawmakers to consider the bill.

The bill, SB 53, was assigned to the Senate Elections and Government Affairs Committee on March 30, but it has not yet come up for debate.

A group backed by employees of TransPerfect Global Inc. is pressing the Delaware Court of Chancery to release details of how the custodian overseeing the company’s court-ordered sale has spent more than $18 million in fees and expenses.

The group, Citizens for a Pro-Business Delaware Inc., announced Tuesday that it had filed a motion asking the court to unseal documents relating to at least 32 confidential transactions undertaken by Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom partner Robert B. Pincus since he was appointed custodian in March 2015.

Responding to a notice filed by The Associated Press in March, Pincus disclosed a monthly accounting of more than $3.5 million in charges “reflecting services provided by the custodian, attorneys from the custodian’s law firm and counsel representing the custodian” in a separate lawsuit. However, the filing did not include fees or expenses paid to other counsel and advisers, and it did not detail how the money was spent.

Now, Citizens, which is not a party to the TransPerfect lawsuit, is seeking to expand the record.

“We are simply asking for Mr. Pincus to share where over $18 million of TransPerfect’s funds have been spent in the last 15 months,” Chris Coffey, the group’s campaign manager said in a statement. “Employees who are already fearful of losing their jobs are now spending more on benefits, while the custodian and his hidden consultants are raking in millions.”

Citizens has been particularly critical of $1,400 per hour rates Pincus has reported charging TransPerfect—an amount Citizens says is more than three times the average rate for similar services in Delaware.

In a brief dated May 12, Citizens asked to intervene in the case to enforce public access to Pincus’ submissions to the court, which the group argued were subject to approval by the court.

“Even if the court is not required to approve such fees and expenses, it necessarily remains that basic information concerning who the court-appointed custodian has hired and how much they have generated in fees and expenses are contained in judicial documents that must be disclosed,” Citizens attorney Evan O. Williford of the Williford Firm said in the filing.

“The custodian advisers’ fees and expenses are relevant to the performance of the judicial function and useful in the judicial process.”

Pincus’ attorney Jennifer C. Voss, also a partner with Skadden, declined to comment on the motion, and Pincus did not return a call seeking comment for this story.

The dustup over records is just the latest scrap in a three-year legal saga that continues to unfold in Delaware’s courts and beyond. In 2015, Chancellor Andre G. Bouchard ordered the forced sale of the profitable translation-services company after personal animosity between Philip R. Shawe and Elizabeth Elting, the firm’s co-founders and chief executives, plunged its corporate governance structure into a hopeless state of gridlock. That decision has since been upheld by the Delaware Supreme Court.

However, Shawe and his mother, Shirley Shawe, have launched a federal lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the sale, and Shirley has asked Bouchard to compel a stockholder’s meeting to adopt a plan that she argues could avert the need for a forced sale. Elting, who rejected the proposal out of court, has moved for sanctions against Shirley for pursuing her motion.

Meanwhile, Citizens has been engaged in an intense lobbying campaign in Dover, as it pushes legislation that could be used in ongoing efforts to overturn Bouchard’s controversial decision.

The bill would require a three-year “cooling-off” period before a judge could order the sale of a solvent private company, and it would require the court to first pursue other avenues to resolve corporate conflict. The Delaware State Bar Association declined to include the measure in its annual package of proposed amendments to the Delaware General Corporation Law, but a group of seven sponsors have introduced the legislation in the General Assembly.

Earlier this month, The New Journal reported that Citizens faced blowback from lawmakers over ads set to air in Delaware, Nevada and Rhode Island, which they said cast the First State in a bad light. The group has since pulled the ads outside of Delaware, and Coffey wrote in an op-ed that he still expected lawmakers to consider the bill.

The bill, SB 53, was assigned to the Senate Elections and Government Affairs Committee on March 30, but it has not yet come up for debate.