Businessman using iPad
Businessman using iPad ()

For many, the modern workplace isn’t tethered to geography, but rather defined by an assembly of devices located in the office, living room, and anywhere in between. Employers and employees alike are making use of this increased interconnectivity, and technology companies are finding new ways to address changing workplace preferences.

Legal technology is no different, and the industry as a whole has seen mobile tools supplying everything from practice management to analytics. But many parts of e-discovery, legal technology’s all-star, can be a tricky process to unpack on a mobile device, especially given the breadth of documents potentially in a review set.

kCura is betting they can simplify such processes, furthering a broader mobile strategy with a native iPad app that lets Relativity users review and code documents. Why mobile? kCura product manager Rishi Kullar spoke with Legaltech News about the native app and how attorneys may benefit from being able to review and code from outside the office:

Product: There’s no official name for this app, but basically it’s a mobile version of kCura’s Relativity platform that allows users to handle a few tasks around document review.

Suitable for following devices: At present, the app is only available on the iPad. Kullar said that kCura plans to eventually versions of the app for the iPhone as well as Android devices.

Intended audience: The app is geared toward outside counsel, particularly associates, senior associates and partners, i.e. those knee deep in the litigation as opposed to contract reviewers.

“We don’t foresee contract reviewers using this, but one of the senior attorneys prepping for a deposition or QC review,” Kullar said. “Mobile is important to these types of users.”

What it does: The Relativity App allows attorneys to review and code documents on the fly without having to boot up a computer to access Relativity. The application pretty much serves as an extension of Relativity, letting users access folders and workplaces stored on both on-premise and cloud versions of Relativity.

Potential benefits: Speed, mainly, in terms of the workflow. Take a deposition, for example, which Kullar called “a natural mobile event for a litigation.” The app would allow a user to review the document on the go, “wrap your head around” witnesses and evidence, and how it all ties into case strategies while en route to a deposition.

Further, there’s the general ubiquity of mobile devices in the legal profession. According to the 2016 ABA Tech Survey, 43 percent of attorneys use an iPad (up 3 percent from the previous year). Further, when asked whether they use smartphones for “law-related tasks” outside of the workplace, only about 7 percent said no.

Potential snags: Availability is not as “cut-and-dry” as for all Relativity users. In order to run this mobile extension of a workflow, users must have the February update of version Relativity 9.5, whether using Relativity One or the on-site version. Also, the app is only currently available to iPad users, so if you have an Android or Windows tablet, you’re out of luck.

Charting the roadmap: kCura’s mobile roadmap is slated to focus on law firm partners, intended to aid in workflows around caste strategy. Specifically, the company wants to integrate its Fact Manager product, mobile transcription, and mobile tasks like managing users and groups.

For many, the modern workplace isn’t tethered to geography, but rather defined by an assembly of devices located in the office, living room, and anywhere in between. Employers and employees alike are making use of this increased interconnectivity, and technology companies are finding new ways to address changing workplace preferences.

Legal technology is no different, and the industry as a whole has seen mobile tools supplying everything from practice management to analytics. But many parts of e-discovery, legal technology’s all-star, can be a tricky process to unpack on a mobile device, especially given the breadth of documents potentially in a review set.

kCura is betting they can simplify such processes, furthering a broader mobile strategy with a native iPad app that lets Relativity users review and code documents. Why mobile? kCura product manager Rishi Kullar spoke with Legaltech News about the native app and how attorneys may benefit from being able to review and code from outside the office:

Product: There’s no official name for this app, but basically it’s a mobile version of kCura’s Relativity platform that allows users to handle a few tasks around document review.

Suitable for following devices: At present, the app is only available on the iPad. Kullar said that kCura plans to eventually versions of the app for the iPhone as well as Android devices.

Intended audience: The app is geared toward outside counsel, particularly associates, senior associates and partners, i.e. those knee deep in the litigation as opposed to contract reviewers.

“We don’t foresee contract reviewers using this, but one of the senior attorneys prepping for a deposition or QC review,” Kullar said. “Mobile is important to these types of users.”

What it does: The Relativity App allows attorneys to review and code documents on the fly without having to boot up a computer to access Relativity. The application pretty much serves as an extension of Relativity, letting users access folders and workplaces stored on both on-premise and cloud versions of Relativity.

Potential benefits: Speed, mainly, in terms of the workflow. Take a deposition, for example, which Kullar called “a natural mobile event for a litigation.” The app would allow a user to review the document on the go, “wrap your head around” witnesses and evidence, and how it all ties into case strategies while en route to a deposition.

Further, there’s the general ubiquity of mobile devices in the legal profession. According to the 2016 ABA Tech Survey, 43 percent of attorneys use an iPad (up 3 percent from the previous year). Further, when asked whether they use smartphones for “law-related tasks” outside of the workplace, only about 7 percent said no.

Potential snags: Availability is not as “cut-and-dry” as for all Relativity users. In order to run this mobile extension of a workflow, users must have the February update of version Relativity 9.5, whether using Relativity One or the on-site version. Also, the app is only currently available to iPad users, so if you have an Android or Windows tablet, you’re out of luck.

Charting the roadmap: kCura’s mobile roadmap is slated to focus on law firm partners, intended to aid in workflows around caste strategy. Specifically, the company wants to integrate its Fact Manager product, mobile transcription, and mobile tasks like managing users and groups.