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The trends driving the legal technology space evolve quickly, and as a result, keeping abreast of the latest developments can be a difficult prospect. A single case, technological advancement or cresting trend has the capacity to disrupt not only the way law is practiced, but also the effectiveness of tools developed to support it. While predicting the next big shake-up is a bit of a guessing game, no group is better prepared to give context to the space than the attorneys, vendors and analysts that live at the crossroads of technology and law.

In each print magazine, Legaltech News’ Techology Digest brings together the voices of these professionals, offering an uneditorialized view into their top-of-mind thoughts and concerns. Our goal is to give deeper context to the industry, coloring our original content with the (sometimes conflicting) voices of those with boots on the ground. These are selected quotes from the November/December edition.

Who’s Your New Buddy?

Changing technology (with attendant benefits and risks) is driving the need for lawyers to expand their set of BFF’s. Increased privacy regulation, cybersecurity threats, suggestions that lawyers are a weak link in data protection, and a recent focus on technology in rules of competence should serve as wake-up calls for counsel to add the CIO, IT, and a security specialist or two to their inner circle. Ultimately, counsel needs to know enough to glean what they are not technologically competent to handle and form appropriate alliances with those who have those competencies. This calls for an unprecedented level of collaboration of lawyers with in-house “techies” and, where warranted, with external experts.

— Julia Brickell, general counsel, H5

Fortifying Your Data Chain

It’s painful to see any organization in the news for a security breach. Cybersecurity has become a foremost concern for corporations—not just for IT but also legal. Protecting digital information can mean the difference between success and serious injury to customer confidence. For this reason, corporations will approach cybersecurity with heightened standards. Security must be a shared responsibility between the customer, software provider and hosting provider. Every party must ensure security, or nothing is secure. Software and hosting providers must demonstrate system controls for logical and physical access, as well as encrypting data both in-transit and at rest. Customers must embrace policies such as least-privileged access and use data appropriately and observe compliance standards, like PCI and HIPAA. Corporate security is dependent on elevating the standards proactively, and those who don’t are proceeding at their own peril.

— Lee Harding, CTO, Zapproved

From E-Discovery to Cybersecurity

Digital forensics is the greatest bridge between the e-discovery and cybersecurity disciplines. Hands-on skills in EnCase, FTK, Cellebrite and many other collection software are being utilized by professionals in both industries. The highest demand for talent in the cybersecurity marketplace involves incident response and data breach remediation, which is right in the overlap of e-discovery and cyber. This area also includes a high demand for roles like threat analysts, SOC (security operations center) staff, and malware engineers. Those with forensic certifications and experience in data collection will have the easiest time transitioning from e-discovery jobs to incident response teams.

Data governance attorneys, many of whom had lengthy careers in e-discovery, are also transitioning disciplines. These attorneys are cornering a new niche of legal counsel, focusing on the nuance of preparing for and responding to a data breach. Outside of forensic investigation, sales, and practicing data protection legal work, the career transition from one discipline to another is not a short and easy path. It requires significant additional education and certification, an understanding of advanced developing technology proficiencies, and above all, patience.

— Jared Coseglia, founder and CEO, TRU Staffing Partners

The trends driving the legal technology space evolve quickly, and as a result, keeping abreast of the latest developments can be a difficult prospect. A single case, technological advancement or cresting trend has the capacity to disrupt not only the way law is practiced, but also the effectiveness of tools developed to support it. While predicting the next big shake-up is a bit of a guessing game, no group is better prepared to give context to the space than the attorneys, vendors and analysts that live at the crossroads of technology and law.

In each print magazine, Legaltech News’ Techology Digest brings together the voices of these professionals, offering an uneditorialized view into their top-of-mind thoughts and concerns. Our goal is to give deeper context to the industry, coloring our original content with the (sometimes conflicting) voices of those with boots on the ground. These are selected quotes from the November/December edition.

Who’s Your New Buddy?

Changing technology (with attendant benefits and risks) is driving the need for lawyers to expand their set of BFF’s. Increased privacy regulation, cybersecurity threats, suggestions that lawyers are a weak link in data protection, and a recent focus on technology in rules of competence should serve as wake-up calls for counsel to add the CIO, IT, and a security specialist or two to their inner circle. Ultimately, counsel needs to know enough to glean what they are not technologically competent to handle and form appropriate alliances with those who have those competencies. This calls for an unprecedented level of collaboration of lawyers with in-house “techies” and, where warranted, with external experts.

— Julia Brickell, general counsel, H5

Fortifying Your Data Chain

It’s painful to see any organization in the news for a security breach. Cybersecurity has become a foremost concern for corporations—not just for IT but also legal. Protecting digital information can mean the difference between success and serious injury to customer confidence. For this reason, corporations will approach cybersecurity with heightened standards. Security must be a shared responsibility between the customer, software provider and hosting provider. Every party must ensure security, or nothing is secure. Software and hosting providers must demonstrate system controls for logical and physical access, as well as encrypting data both in-transit and at rest. Customers must embrace policies such as least-privileged access and use data appropriately and observe compliance standards, like PCI and HIPAA. Corporate security is dependent on elevating the standards proactively, and those who don’t are proceeding at their own peril.

— Lee Harding, CTO, Zapproved

From E-Discovery to Cybersecurity

Digital forensics is the greatest bridge between the e-discovery and cybersecurity disciplines. Hands-on skills in EnCase, FTK, Cellebrite and many other collection software are being utilized by professionals in both industries. The highest demand for talent in the cybersecurity marketplace involves incident response and data breach remediation, which is right in the overlap of e-discovery and cyber. This area also includes a high demand for roles like threat analysts, SOC (security operations center) staff, and malware engineers. Those with forensic certifications and experience in data collection will have the easiest time transitioning from e-discovery jobs to incident response teams.

Data governance attorneys, many of whom had lengthy careers in e-discovery, are also transitioning disciplines. These attorneys are cornering a new niche of legal counsel, focusing on the nuance of preparing for and responding to a data breach. Outside of forensic investigation, sales, and practicing data protection legal work, the career transition from one discipline to another is not a short and easy path. It requires significant additional education and certification, an understanding of advanced developing technology proficiencies, and above all, patience.

— Jared Coseglia, founder and CEO, TRU Staffing Partners