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Stetson University had the highest Florida Bar passage rate in the state on the February exam at 85 percent, while Ave Maria School of Law had the lowest rate at just 30 percent.

The Florida Board of Bar Examiners reported a total of 805 students took the exam in Tampa and 587 passed for a passing rate of 73 percent.

Florida State University came in second with an 82.8 percent passage rate, and Florida International University was third at 81.3 percent. University of Miami came in fourth at an 80.7 percent.

In general, passage rates were lower than in the last two exam periods. The rate released last September was 77 percent and 80.2 percent a year ago.

University of Florida, Nova Southeastern University, Barry University, St. Thomas University and Florida Coastal School of Law all dropped this period.

The largest drop was experienced by UF, which fell from 88 percent to 64.7 percent. Nova’s passage rate dropped from 81.8 percent in September to 69.6 percent.

UF law dean Robert Jerry called the latest results a “statistical abnormality,” noting just 17 Gators took the test in February compared to 321 last July. Combining the two test periods gives UF a passage rate of 87 percent, he said.

“When you have a small testing event, it’s prone to statistical abnormalities,” Jerry said. “It’s like in baseball. … You have to look at the whole 162-game season.”

Still, Jerry said he will not be happy until the school gets a passage rate above 90 percent.

Alex Acosta, law dean at FIU, said he was pleased with his school’s results.

“FIU graduates continue to succeed on the bar and in the job market,” he said. “This past year, we again had the highest full-time employment rate in South Florida and were again at or near the top in bar passage. We are proud of our graduates’ success.”

Florida A&M University, the state’s historically black university, essentially remained steady with a 72 percent passage rate compared to 71.7 percent last period. Florida Coastal School of Law dipped from 72.9 percent to 67.4 percent.

Stetson University had the highest Florida Bar passage rate in the state on the February exam at 85 percent, while Ave Maria School of Law had the lowest rate at just 30 percent.

The Florida Board of Bar Examiners reported a total of 805 students took the exam in Tampa and 587 passed for a passing rate of 73 percent.

Florida State University came in second with an 82.8 percent passage rate, and Florida International University was third at 81.3 percent. University of Miami came in fourth at an 80.7 percent.

In general, passage rates were lower than in the last two exam periods. The rate released last September was 77 percent and 80.2 percent a year ago.

University of Florida, Nova Southeastern University , Barry University, St. Thomas University and Florida Coastal School of Law all dropped this period.

The largest drop was experienced by UF, which fell from 88 percent to 64.7 percent. Nova’s passage rate dropped from 81.8 percent in September to 69.6 percent.

UF law dean Robert Jerry called the latest results a “statistical abnormality,” noting just 17 Gators took the test in February compared to 321 last July. Combining the two test periods gives UF a passage rate of 87 percent, he said.

“When you have a small testing event, it’s prone to statistical abnormalities,” Jerry said. “It’s like in baseball. … You have to look at the whole 162-game season.”

Still, Jerry said he will not be happy until the school gets a passage rate above 90 percent.

Alex Acosta , law dean at FIU, said he was pleased with his school’s results.

“FIU graduates continue to succeed on the bar and in the job market,” he said. “This past year, we again had the highest full-time employment rate in South Florida and were again at or near the top in bar passage. We are proud of our graduates’ success.”

Florida A&M University, the state’s historically black university, essentially remained steady with a 72 percent passage rate compared to 71.7 percent last period. Florida Coastal School of Law dipped from 72.9 percent to 67.4 percent.