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In the Law Tribune’s employment law special section, articles focus on the new Defend Trade Secrets Act, class action waivers, new overtime rules and other topics.


How to Reap the Benefits of the New Federal Trade Secret Misappropriation Law
Employers looking to heighten available protection of valuable trade secrets are welcoming the arrival of the Defend Trade Secrets Act, a federal statute that went into effect May 11. The DTSA permits trade secret owners to file misappropriation claims in federal court, but only those owners who first implement some important changes to confidentiality agreements can reap the full scope of benefits of the new law. Read more


A New Arrow to Attack Those Who Steal Trade Secrets
Last month, Congress passed the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016. This momentous new law establishes a federal cause of action for companies who have trade secrets misappropriated. Described by legal scholars as “the most significant expansion of federal law in intellectual property since the Lanham Act in 1946,” the act is intended to enhance the ability of companies to fight back against those who would steal their trade secrets. Read more


Epic Showdown Looming Over Employee Class Action Waivers
Employers commonly require new employees to execute arbitration agreements as a condition of employment. In many instances, such arbitration agreements contain class/collective action waivers, which provide that any employment-related disputes be adjudicated through arbitration and the employee waives his or her right to file or participate in any class/collective action in court. Read more


Impact of Defend Trade Secrets Act in Connecticut
Connecticut companies have had access to robust enforcement of trade secrets protection primarily through Connecticut’s Uniform Trade Secrets Act, Conn. Gen. Stat. §35-51 et seq. With the enactment of the federal Defend Trade Secrets Act, 18 U.S.C. §1831 et seq., effective May 11, 2016, owners of trade secrets can now pursue a private right of action in federal court to protect trade secrets. Read more


New DOL Overtime Rule: Where Does This Leave Connecticut Businesses and Employees?
With Connecticut’s job growth stalling and the expected departure of several large employers, it’s not completely clear what the new Department of Labor overtime rule will mean for Connecticut. Read more


Workforce Reductions to Avoid Penalties Under the Affordable Care Act
With the Affordable Care Act in full swing more than five years after its enactment, employers continue to weigh the costs of ACA compliance against the risks of reducing their workforce mix so as to avoid paying penalties to the Internal Revenue Service. Read more


Agency Updates Sex Discrimination Laws for Federal Contractors
On June 14, the Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) announced its final rule, “Discrimination on the Basis of Sex,” which sets forth the requirements that federal contractors (including subcontractors) must meet to fulfill their obligations under Presidential Executive Order 11246 (E.O. 11246). Read more


What Final Overtime Regulations Mean for Connecticut Employers
On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor released its highly anticipated and contentious revisions to the Fair Labor Standards Act overtime regulations. The new regulations, which go into effect Dec. 1, make significant changes to the salary threshold for classifying an employee as exempt from the overtime requirement pursuant to the administrative, executive and professional exemptions. The changes will likely impact the exemption status of 4.2 million employees nation­wide, including approximately 46,000 employees in Connecticut, resulting in U.S. employers paying an estimated additional $1.2 billion in wages in just the first year of implementation. Read more

In the Law Tribune’s employment law special section, articles focus on the new Defend Trade Secrets Act, class action waivers, new overtime rules and other topics.


How to Reap the Benefits of the New Federal Trade Secret Misappropriation Law
Employers looking to heighten available protection of valuable trade secrets are welcoming the arrival of the Defend Trade Secrets Act, a federal statute that went into effect May 11. The DTSA permits trade secret owners to file misappropriation claims in federal court, but only those owners who first implement some important changes to confidentiality agreements can reap the full scope of benefits of the new law. Read more


A New Arrow to Attack Those Who Steal Trade Secrets
Last month, Congress passed the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016. This momentous new law establishes a federal cause of action for companies who have trade secrets misappropriated. Described by legal scholars as “the most significant expansion of federal law in intellectual property since the Lanham Act in 1946,” the act is intended to enhance the ability of companies to fight back against those who would steal their trade secrets. Read more


Epic Showdown Looming Over Employee Class Action Waivers
Employers commonly require new employees to execute arbitration agreements as a condition of employment. In many instances, such arbitration agreements contain class/collective action waivers, which provide that any employment-related disputes be adjudicated through arbitration and the employee waives his or her right to file or participate in any class/collective action in court. Read more


Impact of Defend Trade Secrets Act in Connecticut
Connecticut companies have had access to robust enforcement of trade secrets protection primarily through Connecticut’s Uniform Trade Secrets Act, Conn. Gen. Stat. §35-51 et seq. With the enactment of the federal Defend Trade Secrets Act, 18 U.S.C. §1831 et seq. , effective May 11, 2016, owners of trade secrets can now pursue a private right of action in federal court to protect trade secrets. Read more


New DOL Overtime Rule: Where Does This Leave Connecticut Businesses and Employees?
With Connecticut’s job growth stalling and the expected departure of several large employers, it’s not completely clear what the new Department of Labor overtime rule will mean for Connecticut. Read more


Workforce Reductions to Avoid Penalties Under the Affordable Care Act
With the Affordable Care Act in full swing more than five years after its enactment, employers continue to weigh the costs of ACA compliance against the risks of reducing their workforce mix so as to avoid paying penalties to the Internal Revenue Service. Read more


Agency Updates Sex Discrimination Laws for Federal Contractors
On June 14, the Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) announced its final rule, “Discrimination on the Basis of Sex,” which sets forth the requirements that federal contractors (including subcontractors) must meet to fulfill their obligations under Presidential Executive Order 11246 (E.O. 11246). Read more


What Final Overtime Regulations Mean for Connecticut Employers
On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor released its highly anticipated and contentious revisions to the Fair Labor Standards Act overtime regulations. The new regulations, which go into effect Dec. 1, make significant changes to the salary threshold for classifying an employee as exempt from the overtime requirement pursuant to the administrative, executive and professional exemptions. The changes will likely impact the exemption status of 4.2 million employees nation­wide, including approximately 46,000 employees in Connecticut, resulting in U.S. employers paying an estimated additional $1.2 billion in wages in just the first year of implementation. Read more