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The bankruptcies this week of a global information technology consultancy and a pair of medical device makers are the latest round of Chapter 11 filings to reveal the unpaid legal bills of several large firms.

Ciber Inc., a suburban Denver-based IT company that has fallen on hard times in recent years, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware on April 9. Ciber, which has secured a $45 million debtor-in-possession loan from Wells Fargo & Co. and a $50 million offer from France’s Cap Gemini for its North American and Indian assets, also owes $830,000 in attorney fees.

According to a list of Ciber’s 20 largest unsecured creditors, the company owes $599,375 to British firm Bird & Bird and $229,864 to Polsinelli. Federal court records show that Polsinelli has represented Ciber in litigation with ACE American Insurance Co., while Bird & Bird has handed technology-related matters for Ciber in Europe.

Ciber, which had a law school legal technology program once profiled by sibling publication The National Law Journal, has watched some of its top in-house lawyers recently flee for new jobs.

Sean Radcliffe, Ciber’s former general counsel, left in February to become executive vice president and general counsel at Chicago-based R1 RCM Inc., which until January was known as Accretive Health. Tara Dunn, a Ciber vice president and deputy general counsel hired by the company from Perkins Coie in 2015, left last month to become president at TLTE LLC in Denver, according to her profile on professional networking website Linkedin.

Brett Miller, managing partner of Morrison & Foerster’s New York office, is advising Ciber in its Chapter 11 case along with Boston-based restructuring partner Dennis Jenkins, who joined the firm in January. Saul Ewing is serving as the company’s local bankruptcy counsel through partner Sharon Levine in Newark. Neither firm has yet filed billing statements with the bankruptcy court. Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom is representing Cap Gemini on its bid for certain Ciber assets, while Reed Smith and Chicago-based Goldberg Kohn are counseling Wells Fargo in its role as DIP lender.

Unilife Corp., a company developing so-called wearable injectors to deliver drugs for pharmaceutical clients, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware on April 12. The York, Pennsylvania-based company, which lists nearly $83 million in assets against $201.1 million in liabilities, counts as part of the latter monies owed to some of its outside lawyers.

According to a tally of the Unilife’s 20 largest unsecured creditors, the company owes $144,599.91 to Chicago-based IP firm Leydig, Voit & Mayer; $111,464.45 to Duane Morris; and $88,437 to Simpson Thacher & Bartlett. John Ryan, a former Duane Morris partner, served as general counsel at Unilife before taking over as CEO of the company last year. Unilife’s current general counsel is Stephanie Walters. Leydig Voit has handled patent work for the company, while Simpson Thacher is advising Unilife in securities litigation.

Cozen O’Connor bankruptcy co-chair Mark Felger ($730 per hour) and partners Frederick “Erik” Schmidt Jr. ($710) and Eric Scherling ($550) are counseling Unilife in Chapter 11. The company paid retainers totaling $300,000 to Cozen in the 90 prior to Unilife’s bankruptcy case, according to a declaration by Felger. National bankruptcy boutique Pachulski Stang Ziehl & Jones is representing ROS Acquisition Offshore LP, an entity providing $7 million in DIP financing for Unilife. (ROS is an affiliate of New York-based investment firm OribMed Advisors LLC, which has reportedly provided at least $70 million to the debtor since 2014.)

Halt Medical Inc., a manufacturer of a medical device called Acessa used to treat uterine fibroids, also filed for bankruptcy in Delaware on April 12. The Brentwood, California-based company announced Thursday that it had agreed to be acquired by an affiliate of Acessa Health Inc., with which it also secured a $4 million DIP loan. Smith, Gambrell & Russell and Delaware’s Landis Rath & Cobb are advising Acessa in Halt Medical’s Chapter 11 case.

Drinker Biddle & Reath is serving as general bankruptcy counsel to Halt Medical, while Cooley is serving as the company’s special corporate counsel. Neither firm has yet filled billing statements with the bankruptcy court. According to a list of the Halt Medical’s 20 largest unsecured creditors, the company owes $4,588 to Southern California’s L+G.

A third medical device company, Utah’s Alliance Medical Holdings LLC, filed for bankruptcy in Houston on April 7 after federal authorities raided its headquarters near Salt Lake City. Alliance Medical and several affiliates, including Uplift Rx LLC, do not list any law firms among their 20 largest unsecured creditors. New York’s Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler is cited in its role as counsel to pharmaceutical giants Johnson & Johnson and Roche Holding AG, which each have “contingent unliquidated disputed” claims with the debtors.

Baker & Hostetler is advising Alliance Medical and Uplift Rx in bankruptcy court, although the firm has not yet submitted billing statements detailing its work in the Chapter 11 proceedings.

The bankruptcies this week of a global information technology consultancy and a pair of medical device makers are the latest round of Chapter 11 filings to reveal the unpaid legal bills of several large firms.

Ciber Inc., a suburban Denver-based IT company that has fallen on hard times in recent years, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware on April 9. Ciber, which has secured a $45 million debtor-in-possession loan from Wells Fargo & Co. and a $50 million offer from France’s Cap Gemini for its North American and Indian assets, also owes $830,000 in attorney fees.

According to a list of Ciber’s 20 largest unsecured creditors, the company owes $599,375 to British firm Bird & Bird and $229,864 to Polsinelli . Federal court records show that Polsinelli has represented Ciber in litigation with ACE American Insurance Co., while Bird & Bird has handed technology-related matters for Ciber in Europe.

Ciber, which had a law school legal technology program once profiled by sibling publication The National Law Journal, has watched some of its top in-house lawyers recently flee for new jobs.

Sean Radcliffe, Ciber’s former general counsel, left in February to become executive vice president and general counsel at Chicago-based R1 RCM Inc., which until January was known as Accretive Health. Tara Dunn, a Ciber vice president and deputy general counsel hired by the company from Perkins Coie in 2015, left last month to become president at TLTE LLC in Denver, according to her profile on professional networking website Linkedin .

Brett Miller, managing partner of Morrison & Foerster ’s New York office, is advising Ciber in its Chapter 11 case along with Boston-based restructuring partner Dennis Jenkins, who joined the firm in January. Saul Ewing is serving as the company’s local bankruptcy counsel through partner Sharon Levine in Newark. Neither firm has yet filed billing statements with the bankruptcy court. Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom is representing Cap Gemini on its bid for certain Ciber assets, while Reed Smith and Chicago-based Goldberg Kohn are counseling Wells Fargo in its role as DIP lender.

Unilife Corp., a company developing so-called wearable injectors to deliver drugs for pharmaceutical clients, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware on April 12. The York, Pennsylvania-based company, which lists nearly $83 million in assets against $201.1 million in liabilities, counts as part of the latter monies owed to some of its outside lawyers.

According to a tally of the Unilife’s 20 largest unsecured creditors, the company owes $144,599.91 to Chicago-based IP firm Leydig, Voit & Mayer ; $111,464.45 to Duane Morris ; and $88,437 to Simpson Thacher & Bartlett . John Ryan, a former Duane Morris partner, served as general counsel at Unilife before taking over as CEO of the company last year. Unilife’s current general counsel is Stephanie Walters. Leydig Voit has handled patent work for the company, while Simpson Thacher is advising Unilife in securities litigation.

Cozen O’Connor bankruptcy co-chair Mark Felger ($730 per hour) and partners Frederick “Erik” Schmidt Jr. ($710) and Eric Scherling ($550) are counseling Unilife in Chapter 11. The company paid retainers totaling $300,000 to Cozen in the 90 prior to Unilife’s bankruptcy case, according to a declaration by Felger. National bankruptcy boutique Pachulski Stang Ziehl & Jones is representing ROS Acquisition Offshore LP, an entity providing $7 million in DIP financing for Unilife. (ROS is an affiliate of New York-based investment firm OribMed Advisors LLC, which has reportedly provided at least $70 million to the debtor since 2014.)

Halt Medical Inc., a manufacturer of a medical device called Acessa used to treat uterine fibroids, also filed for bankruptcy in Delaware on April 12. The Brentwood, California-based company announced Thursday that it had agreed to be acquired by an affiliate of Acessa Health Inc., with which it also secured a $4 million DIP loan. Smith, Gambrell & Russell and Delaware’s Landis Rath & Cobb are advising Acessa in Halt Medical’s Chapter 11 case.

Drinker Biddle & Reath is serving as general bankruptcy counsel to Halt Medical, while Cooley is serving as the company’s special corporate counsel. Neither firm has yet filled billing statements with the bankruptcy court. According to a list of the Halt Medical’s 20 largest unsecured creditors, the company owes $4,588 to Southern California’s L+G.

A third medical device company, Utah’s Alliance Medical Holdings LLC, filed for bankruptcy in Houston on April 7 after federal authorities raided its headquarters near Salt Lake City. Alliance Medical and several affiliates, including Uplift Rx LLC, do not list any law firms among their 20 largest unsecured creditors. New York ’s Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler is cited in its role as counsel to pharmaceutical giants Johnson & Johnson and Roche Holding AG, which each have “contingent unliquidated disputed” claims with the debtors.

Baker & Hostetler is advising Alliance Medical and Uplift Rx in bankruptcy court, although the firm has not yet submitted billing statements detailing its work in the Chapter 11 proceedings.