Jeffrey Greene
Jeffrey Greene ()

In an effort to grow its nearly year-old New York office, Fenwick & West has brought on Jeffrey Greene as a trademark partner from Foley & Lardner.

Fenwick announced Wednesday its hire of Greene, who served as vice chair of Foley & Lardner’s intellectual property department. When Fenwick opened its Big Apple base in May 2016 with 10 lawyers, the firm’s chairman Richard Dickson said that IP would be a key focus of the new office, along with corporate transactional work.

Greene, who joined Foley & Lardner in 2007 from Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, is the first Fenwick trademark partner in New York. He will work closely with Daniel Brownstone, a patent partner who relocated from Fenwick’s San Francisco office last year. Greene said that Fenwick’s technology focus is a good fit for his clients, which include large financial institutions, a life sciences startup and a large publishing company that distributes print and digital media.

“Here’s this well-known and well-regarded trademark practice that’s looking to expand and solidify their foothold in New York,” Greene said. “It makes sense from a business perspective to have a trademark lawyer [here] that could both service the clients in the New York office but also continue that reputation and that brand generally.”

In a February interview discussing Fenwick’s financial performance in 2016, Dickson said the firm had already added dozens of clients in New York and would continue to build out its practice in the city, where in January it welcomed Lowenstein Sandler partner Ethan Skerry.

Though Fenwick’s gross revenue slipped slightly last year, to $361.5 million, the 310-lawyer firm saw IP-related work remain a bright spot, particularly patent prosecution. Greene said Fenwick reached out to him about six months ago to gauge his interest in coming aboard. The firm then brought him out to Silicon Valley multiple times to get to know its leaders.

“To be honest, they didn’t have to sell me a whole hell of a lot,” Greene said. “I pretty much drank the Kool-Aid within the first couple of meetings.”

In a statement prepared by Fenwick, trademark practice group leader Sally Abel said Greene’s track record—which includes eight years of leading Foley & Lardner’s trademark, copyright and advertising practice—made him “a great fit” for the firm.

“We serve many of the world’s leading companies developing life-changing, innovative technologies, and Jeff’s deep experience and leadership in global trademark portfolio management position him well to be an invaluable asset … for our clients,” Abel said.

The American Lawyer reported last year that Fenwick was one of a few Am Law 100 firms that allows certain lawyers to work from wherever they wish in the country, including places like Chicago, Los Angeles and Williston, Vermont.

Copyright The American Lawyer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

In an effort to grow its nearly year-old New York office, Fenwick & West has brought on Jeffrey Greene as a trademark partner from Foley & Lardner .

Fenwick announced Wednesday its hire of Greene, who served as vice chair of Foley & Lardner ’s intellectual property department. When Fenwick opened its Big Apple base in May 2016 with 10 lawyers, the firm’s chairman Richard Dickson said that IP would be a key focus of the new office, along with corporate transactional work.

Greene, who joined Foley & Lardner in 2007 from Morgan, Lewis & Bockius , is the first Fenwick trademark partner in New York . He will work closely with Daniel Brownstone, a patent partner who relocated from Fenwick’s San Francisco office last year. Greene said that Fenwick’s technology focus is a good fit for his clients, which include large financial institutions, a life sciences startup and a large publishing company that distributes print and digital media.

“Here’s this well-known and well-regarded trademark practice that’s looking to expand and solidify their foothold in New York ,” Greene said. “It makes sense from a business perspective to have a trademark lawyer [here] that could both service the clients in the New York office but also continue that reputation and that brand generally.”

In a February interview discussing Fenwick’s financial performance in 2016, Dickson said the firm had already added dozens of clients in New York and would continue to build out its practice in the city, where in January it welcomed Lowenstein Sandler partner Ethan Skerry.

Though Fenwick’s gross revenue slipped slightly last year, to $361.5 million, the 310-lawyer firm saw IP-related work remain a bright spot, particularly patent prosecution. Greene said Fenwick reached out to him about six months ago to gauge his interest in coming aboard. The firm then brought him out to Silicon Valley multiple times to get to know its leaders.

“To be honest, they didn’t have to sell me a whole hell of a lot,” Greene said. “I pretty much drank the Kool-Aid within the first couple of meetings.”

In a statement prepared by Fenwick, trademark practice group leader Sally Abel said Greene’s track record—which includes eight years of leading Foley & Lardner ’s trademark, copyright and advertising practice—made him “a great fit” for the firm.

“We serve many of the world’s leading companies developing life-changing, innovative technologies, and Jeff’s deep experience and leadership in global trademark portfolio management position him well to be an invaluable asset … for our clients,” Abel said.

The American Lawyer reported last year that Fenwick was one of a few Am Law 100 firms that allows certain lawyers to work from wherever they wish in the country, including places like Chicago, Los Angeles and Williston, Vermont.

Copyright The American Lawyer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.