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Bankruptcy court, long a countercyclical driver for law firm profitability, has been good to Weil, Gotshal & Manges over the years.

In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, Weil had a softer landing than most firms, thanks in part to the whopping sums it was earning from the lengthy Chapter 11 proceedings of key clients like Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.

The New York-based Am Law 100 firm, which last month snagged a lead counsel role for Westinghouse Electric Co. LLC on its Chapter 11 filing in Manhattan, disclosed this week how much it has earned from the nuclear energy company in the run-up to its bankruptcy.

A declaration filed on April 4 by Gary Holtzer, co-chair of Weil’s business finance and restructuring group, states that the firm was paid more than $9.8 million for its work on behalf of Westinghouse in the 90 days prior to its Chapter 11 case. At the time of Westinghouse’s bankruptcy petition, Weil held a fee advance of more than $1.9 million, according to Holtzer.

As part of its application for employment in the case, Weil also submitted engagement letters from July 2015, November 2016, February 2017 and March 2017 detailing the range legal services it will provide Westinghouse, which has been a longtime client of the firm. In 2015, Weil took the lead for Westinghouse on its $299 million acquisition of CB&I Stone & Webster Inc., a nuclear construction company that Westinghouse has blamed for its financial troubles.

The engagement letters were sent by Howard Chatzinoff, co-head of Weil’s M&A practice, to either Westinghouse general counsel Michael Sweeney or assistant general counsel Richard Swanson. Holtzer’s declaration notes that Westinghouse has been a Weil client since the 1970s, with the firm handling corporate, litigation and tax matters for the company.

Partners and counsel at the firm are billing Westinghouse between $940 and $1,400 per hour for their services, while associates are billing at hourly rates ranging from $510 to $930, according to Holtzer’s declaration. The document notes that Weil revised its billing rates in October. (During the firm’s 2016 fiscal year, partners and counsel billed between $900 to $1,350 per hour, and associates at rates ranging from $490 to $885.)

Weil’s work for Westinghouse comes as the Trump administration and Japanese government are reportedly working together to avert a bankruptcy sale of Westinghouse—the Pittsburgh-based debtor is owned by the Tokyo-based Toshiba Corp.—to potential Chinese buyers. Such a transaction could result in key nuclear technology being controlled by a U.S. adversary.

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, as noted by The American Lawyer last week, is advising Toshiba in Westinghouse’s bankruptcy case. Westinghouse has also sought to retain New York’s Togut, Segal & Segal to advise affiliate Toshiba Nuclear Energy Holdings Ltd.

A document filed by name partner and veteran bankruptcy lawyer Albert Togut states that his firm was hired on March 23 with an initial $500,000 retainer. A declaration by Togut states that his hourly rate is $990 and that partners at his firm are billing between $695 to $990 per hour, counsel between $630 to $730 and associates at rates ranging from $320 to $570.

New York-based buyout giant Apollo Global Management LLC, which is providing $800 million in debtor-in-possession financing to Westinghouse, is being advised by Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison bankruptcy partner Jeffrey Saferstein and counsel Claudia Tobler.

Bankruptcy court, long a countercyclical driver for law firm profitability, has been good to Weil, Gotshal & Manges over the years.

In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, Weil had a softer landing than most firms, thanks in part to the whopping sums it was earning from the lengthy Chapter 11 proceedings of key clients like Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.

The New York-based Am Law 100 firm, which last month snagged a lead counsel role for Westinghouse Electric Co. LLC on its Chapter 11 filing in Manhattan, disclosed this week how much it has earned from the nuclear energy company in the run-up to its bankruptcy.

A declaration filed on April 4 by Gary Holtzer, co-chair of Weil’s business finance and restructuring group, states that the firm was paid more than $9.8 million for its work on behalf of Westinghouse in the 90 days prior to its Chapter 11 case. At the time of Westinghouse’s bankruptcy petition, Weil held a fee advance of more than $1.9 million, according to Holtzer.

As part of its application for employment in the case, Weil also submitted engagement letters from July 2015, November 2016, February 2017 and March 2017 detailing the range legal services it will provide Westinghouse, which has been a longtime client of the firm. In 2015, Weil took the lead for Westinghouse on its $299 million acquisition of CB&I Stone & Webster Inc., a nuclear construction company that Westinghouse has blamed for its financial troubles.

The engagement letters were sent by Howard Chatzinoff, co-head of Weil’s M&A practice, to either Westinghouse general counsel Michael Sweeney or assistant general counsel Richard Swanson. Holtzer’s declaration notes that Westinghouse has been a Weil client since the 1970s, with the firm handling corporate, litigation and tax matters for the company.

Partners and counsel at the firm are billing Westinghouse between $940 and $1,400 per hour for their services, while associates are billing at hourly rates ranging from $510 to $930, according to Holtzer’s declaration. The document notes that Weil revised its billing rates in October. (During the firm’s 2016 fiscal year, partners and counsel billed between $900 to $1,350 per hour, and associates at rates ranging from $490 to $885.)

Weil’s work for Westinghouse comes as the Trump administration and Japanese government are reportedly working together to avert a bankruptcy sale of Westinghouse—the Pittsburgh-based debtor is owned by the Tokyo-based Toshiba Corp.—to potential Chinese buyers. Such a transaction could result in key nuclear technology being controlled by a U.S. adversary.

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom , as noted by The American Lawyer last week, is advising Toshiba in Westinghouse’s bankruptcy case. Westinghouse has also sought to retain New York ’s Togut, Segal & Segal to advise affiliate Toshiba Nuclear Energy Holdings Ltd.

A document filed by name partner and veteran bankruptcy lawyer Albert Togut states that his firm was hired on March 23 with an initial $500,000 retainer. A declaration by Togut states that his hourly rate is $990 and that partners at his firm are billing between $695 to $990 per hour, counsel between $630 to $730 and associates at rates ranging from $320 to $570.

New York-based buyout giant Apollo Global Management LLC , which is providing $800 million in debtor-in-possession financing to Westinghouse, is being advised by Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison bankruptcy partner Jeffrey Saferstein and counsel Claudia Tobler.