Proskauer Rose, 11 Times Square, NYC.8-22-2016
Proskauer Rose, 11 Times Square, NYC.8-22-2016 (NYLJ / Monika Kozak)

Proskauer Rose is hiring roughly a dozen lawyers in New York from Stroock & Stroock & Lavan led by the latter’s investment management chair Stuart Coleman.

The move comes sixth months after Coleman stepped down as Stroock’s co-managing partner, a leadership role he held for a decade. Coming with him to Proskauer are five other partners, a senior counsel and at least five associates, said a high-level source briefed on the matter. Proskauer announced its hire of Coleman and part of his team last week. Stroock took his departure in stride.

“Stuart Coleman had a productive career at Stroock,” the firm said in a statement to The American Lawyer. “We thank him for his long service, including his tenure in a co-managing partner role, which concluded last September. As we embark on a new direction for the firm, following our just-completed strategic review, we understand Stuart’s decision to finish his career elsewhere and wish him and his team well.”

Coleman, 62, did not return a request for comment about his decision to leave Stroock. He spent nearly 38 years at the firm, joining Stroock in 1979 after graduating from New York University School of Law.

Two former Stroock partners, who spoke with The American Lawyer on the condition that they not be named, said that Coleman’s departure from the firm was a result of its recent leadership change. In September, Stroock announced that Jeffrey Keitelman would succeed Coleman as co-managing partner. Coleman initially retained a spot on Stroock’s executive committee, but was no longer a member of that group at the time of his departure from the firm earlier this month.

Keitelman, who now shares Stroock’s top leadership role with New York litigator Alan Klinger, became the first firm leader not to be based in the Big Apple. He joined Stroock in May 2015 from DLA Piper in Washington, D.C., where Stroock opened an office two years prior after hiring partner Robert Plaze, a former deputy director of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s division of investment management.

Plaze is among those leaving Stroock with Coleman for Proskauer. Other Stroock lawyers making the move include partners Gary Granik, Janna Manes, Nicole Runyan and David Stephens. Former Stroock partner Bradford Green has joined Proskauer as senior counsel.

“Our corporate department is built to serve asset managers,” said Proskauer chairman Joseph Leccese. “What we needed was more regulatory expertise, and this group [from Stroock] fits us perfectly.”

Leccese said that Coleman’s team represents large asset managers like The Dreyfus Corp., a subsidiary of The Bank of New York Mellon Corp., and iShares, an exchange-traded funds unit of investment management giant BlackRock Inc. Leccese, who assumed Proskauer’s top leadership role in 2011, declined to comment on the process that led Coleman’s group to join the firm.

Coleman and Klinger became co-managing partners of Stroock in January 2007, succeeding longtime firm leader Thomas Heftler, who was tragically killed five months later after being struck by a drunk driver while riding his bike in Southampton, New York. Heftler was just 64.

Klinger and Keitelman were not available Thursday to discuss Stroock’s new strategic direction. But the firm has recently brought in some new recruits. Last week Stroock hired Morrison & Foerster tax partner Michelle Jewett in New York, where the firm brought on wealth and personal client partner Kevin Matz in February from his own shop. In January, Stroock snagged real estate tax certiorari special counsel Thomas Zampino from New York’s Podell, Schwartz, Schecthter & Banfield, where he was a partner.

Stroock has also seen other lawyers leave its ranks, with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld adding private client partner Seth Slotkin in New York, and Cooley snagging former private equity chair Ray LaSoya in Los Angeles, where he joined Stroock from Hughes Hubbard & Reed in 2011. Longtime Stroock partners Joel Goldberg and Donald Gabay, the latter a former chair of its insurance group, have also retired. (Joseph Forstadt, a retired Stroock litigation partner with a long record of public service, died this week at 77.)

Proskauer has also seen a fair amount of lateral activity in 2017. The firm reeled in Rivkin Radler health care partner David Manko in New York to start the year, whiles also picking up King & Wood Mallesons tax partner Stephen Pevsner in London, where he re-joined a handful of former colleagues from legacy SJ Berwin. (Proskauer and the now-defunct London firm broke off tie-up talks in late 2010.)

Glen Lim, a commercial finance partner who joined Proskauer’s Los Angeles office in 2011, left last month for Katten Muchin Rosenman. Winston & Strawn welcomed Proskauer corporate partner Robin Feiner in New York, where she joined the firm in 2013 from UBS Investment Bank. The Trump administration has also recruited from Proskauer’s ranks.

The White House announced earlier this month that it would nominate Proskauer litigation and white-collar defense partner Sigal Mandelker in New York to serve as under secretary for terrorism and financial intelligence at the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Proskauer labor and employment special counsel Daniel Davis in Washington, D.C., also left the firm a few weeks ago to become general counsel at the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

Proskauer Rose is hiring roughly a dozen lawyers in New York from Stroock & Stroock & Lavan led by the latter’s investment management chair Stuart Coleman.

The move comes sixth months after Coleman stepped down as Stroock’s co-managing partner, a leadership role he held for a decade. Coming with him to Proskauer are five other partners, a senior counsel and at least five associates, said a high-level source briefed on the matter. Proskauer announced its hire of Coleman and part of his team last week. Stroock took his departure in stride.

“Stuart Coleman had a productive career at Stroock,” the firm said in a statement to The American Lawyer. “We thank him for his long service, including his tenure in a co-managing partner role, which concluded last September. As we embark on a new direction for the firm, following our just-completed strategic review, we understand Stuart’s decision to finish his career elsewhere and wish him and his team well.”

Coleman, 62, did not return a request for comment about his decision to leave Stroock. He spent nearly 38 years at the firm, joining Stroock in 1979 after graduating from New York University School of Law .

Two former Stroock partners, who spoke with The American Lawyer on the condition that they not be named, said that Coleman’s departure from the firm was a result of its recent leadership change. In September, Stroock announced that Jeffrey Keitelman would succeed Coleman as co-managing partner. Coleman initially retained a spot on Stroock’s executive committee, but was no longer a member of that group at the time of his departure from the firm earlier this month.

Keitelman, who now shares Stroock’s top leadership role with New York litigator Alan Klinger, became the first firm leader not to be based in the Big Apple . He joined Stroock in May 2015 from DLA Piper in Washington, D.C., where Stroock opened an office two years prior after hiring partner Robert Plaze, a former deputy director of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s division of investment management.

Plaze is among those leaving Stroock with Coleman for Proskauer. Other Stroock lawyers making the move include partners Gary Granik, Janna Manes, Nicole Runyan and David Stephens. Former Stroock partner Bradford Green has joined Proskauer as senior counsel.

“Our corporate department is built to serve asset managers,” said Proskauer chairman Joseph Leccese. “What we needed was more regulatory expertise, and this group [from Stroock] fits us perfectly.”

Leccese said that Coleman’s team represents large asset managers like The Dreyfus Corp., a subsidiary of The Bank of New York Mellon Corp., and iShares, an exchange-traded funds unit of investment management giant BlackRock Inc. Leccese, who assumed Proskauer’s top leadership role in 2011, declined to comment on the process that led Coleman’s group to join the firm.

Coleman and Klinger became co-managing partners of Stroock in January 2007, succeeding longtime firm leader Thomas Heftler, who was tragically killed five months later after being struck by a drunk driver while riding his bike in Southampton, New York . Heftler was just 64.

Klinger and Keitelman were not available Thursday to discuss Stroock’s new strategic direction. But the firm has recently brought in some new recruits. Last week Stroock hired Morrison & Foerster tax partner Michelle Jewett in New York , where the firm brought on wealth and personal client partner Kevin Matz in February from his own shop. In January, Stroock snagged real estate tax certiorari special counsel Thomas Zampino from New York ’s Podell, Schwartz, Schecthter & Banfield, where he was a partner.

Stroock has also seen other lawyers leave its ranks, with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld adding private client partner Seth Slotkin in New York , and Cooley snagging former private equity chair Ray LaSoya in Los Angeles, where he joined Stroock from Hughes Hubbard & Reed in 2011. Longtime Stroock partners Joel Goldberg and Donald Gabay, the latter a former chair of its insurance group, have also retired. (Joseph Forstadt, a retired Stroock litigation partner with a long record of public service, died this week at 77.)

Proskauer has also seen a fair amount of lateral activity in 2017. The firm reeled in Rivkin Radler health care partner David Manko in New York to start the year, whiles also picking up King & Wood Mallesons tax partner Stephen Pevsner in London, where he re-joined a handful of former colleagues from legacy SJ Berwin . (Proskauer and the now-defunct London firm broke off tie-up talks in late 2010.)

Glen Lim, a commercial finance partner who joined Proskauer’s Los Angeles office in 2011, left last month for Katten Muchin Rosenman . Winston & Strawn welcomed Proskauer corporate partner Robin Feiner in New York , where she joined the firm in 2013 from UBS Investment Bank. The Trump administration has also recruited from Proskauer’s ranks.

The White House announced earlier this month that it would nominate Proskauer litigation and white-collar defense partner Sigal Mandelker in New York to serve as under secretary for terrorism and financial intelligence at the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Proskauer labor and employment special counsel Daniel Davis in Washington, D.C., also left the firm a few weeks ago to become general counsel at the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.