Anchorage, Alaska. Credit: JonnyNoTrees/iStockphoto.com.
Anchorage, Alaska. Credit: JonnyNoTrees/iStockphoto.com. ()

Crowell & Moring is closing its Alaskan outpost following Holland & Hart’s hire of a six-lawyer environmental team in Anchorage and Washington, D.C.

Holland & Hart announced Tuesday that partners Kyle Parker and John Martin, counsel Sarah Bordelon, John Katchen and Tali Birch Kindred, and nonlawyer senior policy adviser Drue Pearce would join the Denver-based Am Law 200 firm.

“We’re thrilled with the opportunity,” said Parker, a former head of Crowell & Moring’s Anchorage base and the new leader of Holland & Hart’s office in the city. “[Holland & Hart has] as real interest in Alaska and a real vision for their representation for companies that are working in natural resources industries.”

Joining Parker at Holland & Hart in Anchorage are Katchen and Kindred. Martin, an environmental litigation expert, leaves Crowell & Moring’s headquarters in the nation’s capital for Holland & Hart along with Bordelon and Pearce.

Martin and Parker first joined Crowell & Moring as a part of a five-lawyer environmental team that left Patton Boggs for the firm in 2009. The move saw Crowell & Moring open an office in Alaska, a state home to only a few large law firms. (Holland & Knight set up shop in Anchorage in 2014 and Littler Mendelson opened an outpost in 2010.)

Parker (pictured right) said that for about a year, he and Martin had been in talks about a move to Holland & Hart, a 500-lawyer firm that has one of the nation’s largest environmental practices.

“The base of Holland & Hart’s practice is dealing with those exact lands issues that we’ve had to deal with and do deal with regularly in Alaska,” Parker said. “It was a very clean fit for us.”

On Jan. 5, Parker and Martin resigned from Crowell & Moring’s partnership and shortly thereafter the firm began working to shift its entire Anchorage practice over to Holland & Hart. Crowell & Moring counsel Rebecca Copeland and David Mayberry in Anchorage will not make the move to Holland & Hart. Copeland’s registration with the Alaska Bar Association is inactive, while Mayberry said in an email that he was “pursuing another opportunity unrelated” to either firm. He declined further comment.

“We have been focusing pretty extensively on a number of our national practices and our offices on the East and West Coast,” said Crowell & Moring government contracts partner Angela Styles, who assumed leadership of the firm in 2015. “Alaska was harder to fit into the bigger strategy for the firm. They knew we were raising questions about how they fit into the strategy and I think they found a good place for themselves.”

The American Lawyer reported last month on Crowell & Moring’s discussions with New York’s Herrick, Feinstein about a potential combination, although a tie-up is not expected until sometime in 2017. Crowell & Moring, a 500-lawyer firm known for its government contracts and litigation practices in Washington, D.C., where it recently made a high-profile lateral addition from Wiley Rein, has long sought to reshape its national profile.

While Styles declined to comment on any potential merger talks, she did emphasize Crowell & Moring’s commitment to expansion in New York.

“New York is very important part of our strategy in the future and having critical mass [there] is important to us,” Styles said.

Crowell & Moring is closing its Alaskan outpost following Holland & Hart ’s hire of a six-lawyer environmental team in Anchorage and Washington, D.C.

Holland & Hart announced Tuesday that partners Kyle Parker and John Martin , counsel Sarah Bordelon, John Katchen and Tali Birch Kindred, and nonlawyer senior policy adviser Drue Pearce would join the Denver-based Am Law 200 firm.

“We’re thrilled with the opportunity,” said Parker, a former head of Crowell & Moring ’s Anchorage base and the new leader of Holland & Hart ’s office in the city. “[ Holland & Hart has] as real interest in Alaska and a real vision for their representation for companies that are working in natural resources industries.”

Joining Parker at Holland & Hart in Anchorage are Katchen and Kindred. Martin, an environmental litigation expert, leaves Crowell & Moring ’s headquarters in the nation’s capital for Holland & Hart along with Bordelon and Pearce.

Martin and Parker first joined Crowell & Moring as a part of a five-lawyer environmental team that left Patton Boggs for the firm in 2009. The move saw Crowell & Moring open an office in Alaska, a state home to only a few large law firms. ( Holland & Knight set up shop in Anchorage in 2014 and Littler Mendelson opened an outpost in 2010.)

Parker (pictured right) said that for about a year, he and Martin had been in talks about a move to Holland & Hart , a 500-lawyer firm that has one of the nation’s largest environmental practices.

“The base of Holland & Hart ’s practice is dealing with those exact lands issues that we’ve had to deal with and do deal with regularly in Alaska,” Parker said. “It was a very clean fit for us.”

On Jan. 5, Parker and Martin resigned from Crowell & Moring ’s partnership and shortly thereafter the firm began working to shift its entire Anchorage practice over to Holland & Hart . Crowell & Moring counsel Rebecca Copeland and David Mayberry in Anchorage will not make the move to Holland & Hart . Copeland’s registration with the Alaska Bar Association is inactive, while Mayberry said in an email that he was “pursuing another opportunity unrelated” to either firm. He declined further comment.

“We have been focusing pretty extensively on a number of our national practices and our offices on the East and West Coast,” said Crowell & Moring government contracts partner Angela Styles, who assumed leadership of the firm in 2015. “Alaska was harder to fit into the bigger strategy for the firm. They knew we were raising questions about how they fit into the strategy and I think they found a good place for themselves.”

The American Lawyer reported last month on Crowell & Moring ’s discussions with New York ’s Herrick, Feinstein about a potential combination, although a tie-up is not expected until sometime in 2017. Crowell & Moring , a 500-lawyer firm known for its government contracts and litigation practices in Washington, D.C., where it recently made a high-profile lateral addition from Wiley Rein , has long sought to reshape its national profile.

While Styles declined to comment on any potential merger talks, she did emphasize Crowell & Moring ’s commitment to expansion in New York .

New York is very important part of our strategy in the future and having critical mass [there] is important to us,” Styles said.