Former Prime Minister of Canada Stephen Harper.
Former Prime Minister of Canada Stephen Harper. (Credit: yelo34/iStockphoto.com)

Stephen Harper, the former prime minister of Canada who lost his Conservative Party majority to Justin Trudeau and his Liberal Party last year, has a new gig with Dentons.

For Dentons, affiliating with Harper’s newly formed consultancy may help draw legal advisory business to the firm’s extensive international trade practice. Harper, who resigned from Canada’s parliament a month ago, spearheaded trade agreements with the European Union and South Korea, as well as Canada’s participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership, during his nine-year tenure as prime minister.

“This is outstanding news for Dentons and for our clients,” Dentons global CEO Elliott Portnoy said in a statement. Harper’s experience as a G7 leader “will provide invaluable perspective for our clients and our team.”

Harper, for his part, wants to leverage his experience within the G7 and as Canada’s strongest proponent of free trade deals. Harper said in a video on Dentons’ website that the firm’s enormous geographical spread made the affiliation “an excellent fit.”

“I look forward to working with Dentons’ worldwide team to provide clients with the diplomatic and business counsel they need to access markets and to maximize value,” he said.

The deal allows Harper, 57, to remain chair and CEO of his month-old Calgary-based business consultancy, staffed by three former advisers. Dentons didn’t release any other details of the agreement with Harper.

Canadian firms have a long tradition of hiring past party leaders. M. Brian Mulroney, a former Progressive Conservative prime minister, is a senior partner at Norton Rose Fulbright’s Montreal office, while former Liberal prime minister Jean Chrétien has been an of counsel at Dentons since his previous firm, Heenan Blaikie, collapsed in 2014. (Now-deceased Pierre Trudeau joined Heenan post-politics as well.)

Dentons has recently welcomed other former Harper administration officials. Two weeks ago, the firm lured Gary Doer, Canada’s former ambassador to the U.S., and in November, it hired former industry minister James Moore. Both Doer and Moore are senior business advisers.

Stephen Harper, the former prime minister of Canada who lost his Conservative Party majority to Justin Trudeau and his Liberal Party last year, has a new gig with Dentons .

For Dentons , affiliating with Harper’s newly formed consultancy may help draw legal advisory business to the firm’s extensive international trade practice. Harper, who resigned from Canada’s parliament a month ago, spearheaded trade agreements with the European Union and South Korea, as well as Canada’s participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership, during his nine-year tenure as prime minister.

“This is outstanding news for Dentons and for our clients,” Dentons global CEO Elliott Portnoy said in a statement. Harper’s experience as a G7 leader “will provide invaluable perspective for our clients and our team.”

Harper, for his part, wants to leverage his experience within the G7 and as Canada’s strongest proponent of free trade deals. Harper said in a video on Dentons ‘ website that the firm’s enormous geographical spread made the affiliation “an excellent fit.”

“I look forward to working with Dentons ‘ worldwide team to provide clients with the diplomatic and business counsel they need to access markets and to maximize value,” he said.

The deal allows Harper, 57, to remain chair and CEO of his month-old Calgary-based business consultancy, staffed by three former advisers. Dentons didn’t release any other details of the agreement with Harper.

Canadian firms have a long tradition of hiring past party leaders. M. Brian Mulroney, a former Progressive Conservative prime minister, is a senior partner at Norton Rose Fulbright ‘s Montreal office, while former Liberal prime minister Jean Chrétien has been an of counsel at Dentons since his previous firm, Heenan Blaikie , collapsed in 2014. (Now-deceased Pierre Trudeau joined Heenan post-politics as well.)

Dentons has recently welcomed other former Harper administration officials. Two weeks ago, the firm lured Gary Doer, Canada’s former ambassador to the U.S., and in November, it hired former industry minister James Moore . Both Doer and Moore are senior business advisers.