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Eamon O’Kelly, a former head of the antitrust practice at Arent Fox and Dewey & LeBoeuf, has joined Robins Kaplan as of counsel in New York.

The antitrust litigator’s hire, announced Thursday by Robins Kaplan, is the latest in a frenzy of antitrust additions by several large law firms as the Obama administration ramps up enforcement of competition regulations.

“Our addition of Eamon was a result of our growth here in the New York office and the cases that we have existing currently,” said Robins Kap­lan partner Hollis Salzman, who serves as co-chair of the firm’s antitrust and trade regulation group. “He’s one of the smartest antitrust lawyers out there, so we feel very pleased that we’re going to have him as part of our group.”

Robins Kaplan opened its New York office in 2010 with three IP lawyers recruited from Hogan Lovells legacy firm Lovells. The firm’s Big Apple base, now home to 36 lawyers, added Salzman in 2013 from plaintiffs firm Labaton Sucharow. She joined with seven other antitrust lawyers.

Salzman said that Robins Kaplan’s antitrust practice, which represents both plaintiffs and defendants, has been busy in recent months advising on a series of auto parts cases currently being litigated in the Eastern District of Michigan. O’Kelly will help with that litigation, among other cases, she said.

O’Kelly, 63, was co-chair of the antitrust practice at Dewey & LeBoeuf before the firm collapsed in 2012. Two months before the firm eventually filed for bankruptcy, O’Kelly fled Dewey & LeBoeuf to lead the antitrust and competition group at Arent Fox.

In early 2014, O’Kelly left Arent Fox and moved with his wife and his twin children—he has a son and a daughter—to Ireland, where he was born. O’Kelly continued doing antitrust and antibribery consulting work as a solo practitioner based outside Dublin.

“With a laptop and Wi-Fi connection, you can work anywhere,” O’Kelly said. But after a few years, the family decided that they wanted to return to New York, and O’Kelly said he “missed having the structure of a firm behind me.”

O’Kelly picked an ideal time to return stateside. Large firms have been busy in recent weeks ramping up their antitrust practices in anticipation of increased scrutiny from government agencies such as the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice.

In August, a high-powered team of antitrust lawyers left Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft’s office in Washington, D.C., to join Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison. Dechert also joined the fray by hiring Hughes Hubbard & Reed’s antitrust leader for its office in New York.

This week, Jenner & Block bagged Baker & McKenzie’s North America antitrust head Lee Van Voorhis in Washington, D.C. Baker Botts recently hired Michael Perry from the FTC, where he was counsel to the regulator’s director of competition.

Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe also snagged James Tierney from Main Justice, where he headed the antitrust division’s network and technology enforcement section, as Holland & Knight hired David Kully, another longtime Justice Department antitrust litigator. Officials from government agencies have been joining private practices all year as the Obama administration’s second term comes to an end.

Salzman said Robins Kaplan is focused on building up its antitrust practice group in New York, where she said there is a “very vibrant antitrust community.”

The firm, a litigation-centric shop with roots in Minneapolis, lost its former chair and name partner Michael Ciresi in January 2015. Ciresi, who said at the time that he wanted to work at a smaller shop and devote more of his time to philanthropy, left with two other litigation partners to form his own firm.

Eamon O’Kelly, a former head of the antitrust practice at Arent Fox and now-defunct Dewey & LeBoeuf, has joined Robins Kaplan as of counsel in New York. His hire is the latest in a frenzy of antitrust additions by several big firms.

Eamon O’Kelly, a former head of the antitrust practice at Arent Fox and Dewey & LeBoeuf , has joined Robins Kaplan as of counsel in New York .

The antitrust litigator’s hire, announced Thursday by Robins Kaplan , is the latest in a frenzy of antitrust additions by several large law firms as the Obama administration ramps up enforcement of competition regulations.

“Our addition of Eamon was a result of our growth here in the New York office and the cases that we have existing currently,” said Robins Kap­lan partner Hollis Salzman, who serves as co-chair of the firm’s antitrust and trade regulation group. “He’s one of the smartest antitrust lawyers out there, so we feel very pleased that we’re going to have him as part of our group.”

Robins Kaplan opened its New York office in 2010 with three IP lawyers recruited from Hogan Lovells legacy firm Lovells. The firm’s Big Apple base, now home to 36 lawyers, added Salzman in 2013 from plaintiffs firm Labaton Sucharow . She joined with seven other antitrust lawyers.

Salzman said that Robins Kaplan ‘s antitrust practice, which represents both plaintiffs and defendants, has been busy in recent months advising on a series of auto parts cases currently being litigated in the Eastern District of Michigan. O’Kelly will help with that litigation, among other cases, she said.

O’Kelly, 63, was co-chair of the antitrust practice at Dewey & LeBoeuf before the firm collapsed in 2012. Two months before the firm eventually filed for bankruptcy, O’Kelly fled Dewey & LeBoeuf to lead the antitrust and competition group at Arent Fox .

In early 2014, O’Kelly left Arent Fox and moved with his wife and his twin children—he has a son and a daughter—to Ireland, where he was born. O’Kelly continued doing antitrust and antibribery consulting work as a solo practitioner based outside Dublin.

“With a laptop and Wi-Fi connection, you can work anywhere,” O’Kelly said. But after a few years, the family decided that they wanted to return to New York , and O’Kelly said he “missed having the structure of a firm behind me.”

O’Kelly picked an ideal time to return stateside. Large firms have been busy in recent weeks ramping up their antitrust practices in anticipation of increased scrutiny from government agencies such as the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice.

In August, a high-powered team of antitrust lawyers left Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft ‘s office in Washington, D.C., to join Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison . Dechert also joined the fray by hiring Hughes Hubbard & Reed ‘s antitrust leader for its office in New York .

This week, Jenner & Block bagged Baker & McKenzie ‘s North America antitrust head Lee Van Voorhis in Washington, D.C. Baker Botts recently hired Michael Perry from the FTC, where he was counsel to the regulator’s director of competition.

Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe also snagged James Tierney from Main Justice, where he headed the antitrust division’s network and technology enforcement section, as Holland & Knight hired David Kully, another longtime Justice Department antitrust litigator. Officials from government agencies have been joining private practices all year as the Obama administration’s second term comes to an end.

Salzman said Robins Kaplan is focused on building up its antitrust practice group in New York , where she said there is a “very vibrant antitrust community.”

The firm, a litigation-centric shop with roots in Minneapolis, lost its former chair and name partner Michael Ciresi in January 2015. Ciresi, who said at the time that he wanted to work at a smaller shop and devote more of his time to philanthropy, left with two other litigation partners to form his own firm.

Eamon O’Kelly, a former head of the antitrust practice at Arent Fox and now-defunct Dewey & LeBoeuf , has joined Robins Kaplan as of counsel in New York . His hire is the latest in a frenzy of antitrust additions by several big firms.