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christophe_cerisier/iStockphoto ()

DLA Piper has inked a nonexclusive alliance with Afghanistan law firm Kakar Advocates. The alliance has been effective for about eight months, but was officially announced this week, according to Kawun Kakar, founder and managing partner of Kakar Advocates.

Founded in 2013, Kabul-based Kakar Advocates is a full-service firm that employs about a dozen U.S.- and Afghan-licensed attorneys, according to the firm’s website. Clients include foreign embassies, nongovernmental organizations and firms contracted with entities like NATO and the U.S. Department of Defense, the website says. Pajhwok Afghan News reported the alliance June 30.

Reached in Kabul, Kakar said that his firm has worked with DLA Piper for some time, including amending public-private partnerships legislation in Afghanistan. He added that the need for legal services, particularly international, is increasing in Afghanistan, and the firms hope that the new arrangement between will allow them to combine local and international legal expertise.

Afghanistan’s government has been increasingly taking on large, multinational projects, and has been strengthening the legal framework for the country’s banking, mining and aviation sectors, Kakar said. A greater number of public-private partnerships will help attract foreign and local investment, he added. Kakar has held advisory positions with the United Nations, the Afghan government and the Afghanistan Justice Sector Support Program for the U.S. Department of State, according to his LinkedIn profile.

Kakar said that his firm works primarily with lawyers from DLA Piper’s London office, although DLA Piper’s U.S. lawyers have also been supportive of the alliance.

Kakar said that each firm will bill “according to the work it is doing.” Kakar Advocates’ website says that the DLA Piper alliance “enables both firms to jointly market for work [and] assist clients pursuing major projects in the mining, hospitality, telecommunications, aviation, banking (including Islamic banking) and other economic sectors.”

While international firms regularly seek the expertise of select regional firms in Afghanistan, Kakar Advocates’ alliance with DLA Piper appears to be a unique arrangement for the area. Terms of the arrangement allow each firm to work with others. In the past, Kakar Advocates has worked with firms including Baker & McKenzie; Mayer Brown; Norton Rose Fulbright; and Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr, according to the firm.

“Our relationship is not exclusive; it allows us to work with other firms as well and vice versa,” Kakar said of DLA Piper. The alliance, he said, represents a “commitment for long-term collaboration.”

DLA Piper did not respond to a request for comment by press time.

DLA Piper has inked a nonexclusive alliance with Afghanistan law firm Kakar Advocates. The alliance has been effective for about eight months, but was officially announced this week, according to Kawun Kakar, founder and managing partner of Kakar Advocates.

Founded in 2013, Kabul-based Kakar Advocates is a full-service firm that employs about a dozen U.S.- and Afghan-licensed attorneys, according to the firm’s website. Clients include foreign embassies, nongovernmental organizations and firms contracted with entities like NATO and the U.S. Department of Defense, the website says. Pajhwok Afghan News reported the alliance June 30.

Reached in Kabul, Kakar said that his firm has worked with DLA Piper for some time, including amending public-private partnerships legislation in Afghanistan. He added that the need for legal services, particularly international, is increasing in Afghanistan, and the firms hope that the new arrangement between will allow them to combine local and international legal expertise.

Afghanistan’s government has been increasingly taking on large, multinational projects, and has been strengthening the legal framework for the country’s banking, mining and aviation sectors, Kakar said. A greater number of public-private partnerships will help attract foreign and local investment, he added. Kakar has held advisory positions with the United Nations, the Afghan government and the Afghanistan Justice Sector Support Program for the U.S. Department of State, according to his LinkedIn profile.

Kakar said that his firm works primarily with lawyers from DLA Piper ‘s London office, although DLA Piper ‘s U.S. lawyers have also been supportive of the alliance.

Kakar said that each firm will bill “according to the work it is doing.” Kakar Advocates’ website says that the DLA Piper alliance “enables both firms to jointly market for work [and] assist clients pursuing major projects in the mining, hospitality, telecommunications, aviation, banking (including Islamic banking) and other economic sectors.”

While international firms regularly seek the expertise of select regional firms in Afghanistan, Kakar Advocates’ alliance with DLA Piper appears to be a unique arrangement for the area. Terms of the arrangement allow each firm to work with others. In the past, Kakar Advocates has worked with firms including Baker & McKenzie ; Mayer Brown ; Norton Rose Fulbright ; and Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr, according to the firm.

“Our relationship is not exclusive; it allows us to work with other firms as well and vice versa,” Kakar said of DLA Piper . The alliance, he said, represents a “commitment for long-term collaboration.”

DLA Piper did not respond to a request for comment by press time.