Yangon, Myanmar.
Yangon, Myanmar. (Photo: Phuong D. Nguyen/Shutterstock.com)

Dentons has opened an office in Myanmar after acquiring a seven-person local team led by partner Mark Livingston.

Livingston and his team of lawyers and staff join from his own firm, Livingstons Legal, based in the country’s capital of Yangon. They will work closely with Dentons Rodyk, the Singapore firm that joined Dentons in late 2015. Livingston focuses mainly on helping foreign companies manage and resolve regulatory and operational issues in Myanmar.

Before launching his own firm, Livingston served as in-house counsel to Australian miner OceanaGold Corp. and Singapore-based Archipelago Resources.

The launch of Dentons’ Myanmar office comes at a time when the Southeast Asian country has started opening its doors for foreign investors following the ease of economic sanctions imposed by the U.S.

“Myanmar is a major opportunity for business growth in the next five years,” said Philip Jeyaretnam, chief executive of Dentons Rodyk. “Our new team in Yangon will expand our capabilities to provide in-depth legal advice to clients who seek to establish and grow their businesses in Myanmar.”

Many Asian law firms have already entered Myanmar. Singapore’s Allen & Gledhill; WongPartnership; and Rajah & Tann have opened offices in Yangon, as have Japan’s Mori Hamada & Matsumoto; Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu; and Nishimura & Asahi. Korea’s Yulchon and Bae, Kim & Lee have also opened Yangon offices.

Several U.S.- and U.K.-based firms have offices in Myanmar, including Allen & Overy, Baker McKenzie, Duane Morris and Berwin Leighton Paisner.

Dentons now has offices in seven countries in the Asia Pacific region. In addition to Myanmar, the 8,000-lawyer firm is also in Australia, China, Korea, Mongolia, Papua New Guinea and Singapore.

International law firm interest in Myanmar has grown since the country began political reforms in 2011 and changed its foreign investment law to allow foreigners to own 100 percent of their business.

Copyright The Asian Lawyer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Dentons has opened an office in Myanmar after acquiring a seven-person local team led by partner Mark Livingston.

Livingston and his team of lawyers and staff join from his own firm, Livingstons Legal, based in the country’s capital of Yangon. They will work closely with Dentons Rodyk, the Singapore firm that joined Dentons in late 2015. Livingston focuses mainly on helping foreign companies manage and resolve regulatory and operational issues in Myanmar.

Before launching his own firm, Livingston served as in-house counsel to Australian miner OceanaGold Corp. and Singapore-based Archipelago Resources.

The launch of Dentons ‘ Myanmar office comes at a time when the Southeast Asian country has started opening its doors for foreign investors following the ease of economic sanctions imposed by the U.S.

“Myanmar is a major opportunity for business growth in the next five years,” said Philip Jeyaretnam, chief executive of Dentons Rodyk. “Our new team in Yangon will expand our capabilities to provide in-depth legal advice to clients who seek to establish and grow their businesses in Myanmar.”

Many Asian law firms have already entered Myanmar. Singapore’s Allen & Gledhill ; WongPartnership; and Rajah & Tann have opened offices in Yangon, as have Japan’s Mori Hamada & Matsumoto ; Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu ; and Nishimura & Asahi . Korea’s Yulchon and Bae, Kim & Lee have also opened Yangon offices.

Several U.S.- and U.K.-based firms have offices in Myanmar, including Allen & Overy , Baker McKenzie , Duane Morris and Berwin Leighton Paisner .

Dentons now has offices in seven countries in the Asia Pacific region. In addition to Myanmar, the 8,000-lawyer firm is also in Australia, China, Korea, Mongolia, Papua New Guinea and Singapore.

International law firm interest in Myanmar has grown since the country began political reforms in 2011 and changed its foreign investment law to allow foreigners to own 100 percent of their business.

Copyright The Asian Lawyer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.